Cathode-ray tube

a vacuum tube generating a focused beam of electrons that can be deflected by electric fields, magnetic fields, or both. The terminus of the beam is visible as a spot or line of luminescence caused by its impinging on a sensitized screen at one end of the tube. Cathode-ray tubes are used to study the shapes of electric waves, to reproduce images in television receivers, to display alphanumeric and graphical information on computer monitors, as an indicator in radar sets, etc.
Abbreviation: CRT.


Read Also:

  • Cathodic-protection

    protection of ferrous metals against electrolysis by the attachment of sacrificial anodes. noun (metallurgy) a technique for protecting metal structures, such as steel ships and pipelines, from electrolytic corrosion by making the structure the cathode in a cell, either by applying an electromotive force directly or by putting it into contact with a more electropositive […]

  • Cathodic

    pertaining to a cathode or phenomena in its vicinity.

  • Cathodoluminescence

    light emitted by a substance undergoing bombardment by cathode rays. noun (physics) luminescence caused by irradiation with electrons (cathode rays)

  • Catholic-apostolic-church

    a nearly extinct English Protestant church established between 1832 and 1835, stressing the imminent coming of the millennium and the reestablishment of the primitive church’s ministries.

Disclaimer: Cathode-ray tube definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.