Chop-logic



[chop] /tʃɒp/

verb (used without object), chopped, chopping.
1.
to turn, shift, or change suddenly:
The wind chopped to the west.
2.
to vacillate; change one’s mind.
3.
Obsolete.

Idioms
4.
chop logic, to reason or dispute argumentatively; draw unnecessary distinctions.
/tʃɒp/
verb chops, chopping, chopped
1.
often foll by down or off. to cut (something) with a blow from an axe or other sharp tool
2.
(transitive) to produce or make in this manner: to chop firewood
3.
(transitive) often foll by up. to cut into pieces
4.
(transitive) (Brit, informal) to dispense with or reduce
5.
(intransitive) to move quickly or violently
6.
(sport) to hit (a ball) sharply downwards
7.
(boxing, martial arts) to punch or strike (an opponent) with a short sharp blow
8.
(W African) an informal word for eat
noun
9.
a cutting blow
10.
the act or an instance of chopping
11.
a piece chopped off
12.
a slice of mutton, lamb, or pork, generally including a rib
13.
(Austral & NZ, slang) a share (esp in the phrase get or hop in for one’s chop)
14.
(W African) an informal word for food
15.
(Austral & NZ) a competition of skill and speed in chopping logs
16.
(sport) a sharp downward blow or stroke
17.
(Austral & NZ, informal) not much chop, not much good; poor
18.
(slang) the chop, dismissal from employment
/tʃɒp/
verb chops, chopping, chopped
1.
(intransitive) to change direction suddenly; vacillate (esp in the phrase chop and change)
2.
(obsolete) to barter
3.
chop logic, to use excessively subtle or involved logic or argument
/tʃɒp/
noun
1.
a design stamped on goods as a trademark, esp in the Far East
v.

“to cut with a quick blow,” mid-14c., of uncertain origin, perhaps from Old North French choper (Old French coper “to cut, cut off,” 12c., Modern French couper), from Vulgar Latin *cuppare “to behead,” from a root meaning “head,” but influenced in Old French by couper “to strike.” Related: Chopped; chopping.

“shift quickly,” 1530s, earlier “to bargain” (early 15c.), ultimately from Old English ceapian “to bargain” (see cheap); here with a sense of “changing back and forth,” probably from common expressions such as to chop and change “barter.” To chop logic is recorded from 1570s. Related: Chopped; chopping.
n.

“act of chopping,” mid-14c., from chop (v.1). Meaning “piece cut off” is mid-15c.; specifically “slice of meat” from mid-17c. Sense of “a blow, strike” is from 1550s.

noun

[1823+; fr Hindi, ”seal”]

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