Comment



[kom-ent] /ˈkɒm ɛnt/

noun
1.
a remark, observation, or criticism:
a comment about the weather.
2.
gossip; talk:
His frequent absences gave rise to comment.
3.
a criticism or interpretation, often by implication or suggestion:
The play is a comment on modern society.
4.
a user response to published content on the Internet, written in a designated “Comments” section, often below the published content:
There were many online comments criticizing the author.
5.
a note in explanation, expansion, or criticism of a passage in a book, article, or the like; annotation.
6.
explanatory or critical matter added to a text.
7.
Also called rheme. Linguistics. the part of a sentence that communicates new information about the topic.
Compare (def 4).
verb (used without object)
8.
to make remarks, observations, or criticisms:
He refused to comment on the decision of the court.
9.
to write explanatory or critical notes upon a text.
verb (used with object)
10.
to make comments or remarks on; furnish with comments; annotate.
/ˈkɒmɛnt/
noun
1.
a remark, criticism, or observation
2.
talk or gossip
3.
a note explaining or criticizing a passage in a text
4.
explanatory or critical matter added to a text
verb
5.
when intr, often foll by on; when tr, takes a clause as object. to remark or express an opinion
6.
(intransitive) to write notes explaining or criticizing a text
n.

late 14c., from Old French coment “commentary” or directly from Late Latin commentum “comment, interpretation,” in classical Latin “invention, fabrication, fiction,” neuter past participle of comminisci “to contrive, devise,” from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + base of meminisse “to remember,” related to mens (genitive mentis) “mind” (see mind (n.)). The Latin word meaning “something invented” was taken by Isidore and other Christian theologians for “interpretation, annotation.” No comment as a stock refusal to answer a journalist’s question is first recorded 1950, from Truman’s White House press secretary, Charles Ross.
v.

early 15c., from Middle French commenter (15c.), from Latin commentari, from commentum (see comment (n.)). Related: Commented; commenting.

programming
(Or “remark”) Explanatory text embedded in program source (or less often data) intended to help human readers understand it.
Code completely without comments is often hard to read, but code with too many comments is also bad, especially if the comments are not kept up-to-date with changes to the code. Too much commenting may mean that the code is over-complicated. A good rule is to comment everything that needs it but write code that doesn’t need much of it. Comments that explain __why__ something is done and how the code relates to its environment are useful.
A particularly irksome form of over-commenting explains exactly what each statement does, even when it is obvious to any reasonably competant programmer, e.g.
/* Open the input file */ infd = open(input_file, O_RDONLY);
(2007-02-19)

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    [kom-uh n-ter-ee] /ˈkɒm ənˌtɛr i/ noun, plural commentaries. 1. a series of , explanations, or annotations: a commentary on the Bible; news followed by a commentary. 2. an explanatory essay or treatise: a commentary on a play; Blackstone’s commentaries on law. 3. anything serving to illustrate a point, prompt a realization, or exemplify, especially in […]



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