Common-snipe



noun
1.
See under (def 1).
[snahyp] /snaɪp/
noun, plural snipes (especially collectively) snipe for 1, 2.
1.
any of several long-billed game birds of the genera Gallinago (Capella) and Limnocryptes, inhabiting marshy areas, as G. gallinago (common snipe) of Eurasia and North America, having barred and striped white, brown, and black plumage.
2.
any of several other long-billed birds, as some sandpipers.
3.
a shot, usually from a hidden position.
verb (used without object), sniped, sniping.
4.
to shoot or hunt snipe.
5.
to shoot at individuals as opportunity offers from a concealed or distant position:
The enemy was sniping from the roofs.
6.
to attack a person or a person’s work with petulant or snide criticism, especially anonymously or from a safe distance.
/snaɪp/
noun (pl) snipe, snipes
1.
any of various birds of the genus Gallinago (or Capella) and related genera, such as G. gallinago (common or Wilson’s snipe), of marshes and river banks, having a long straight bill: family Scolopacidae (sandpipers, etc), order Charadriiformes
2.
any of various similar related birds, such as certain sandpipers and curlews
3.
a shot, esp a gunshot, fired from a place of concealment
verb
4.
when intr, often foll by at. to attack (a person or persons) with a rifle from a place of concealment
5.
(intransitive) often foll by at. to criticize adversely a person or persons from a position of security
6.
(intransitive) to hunt or shoot snipe
n.

long-billed marsh bird, early 14c., from Old Norse -snipa in myrisnipa “moor snipe;” perhaps a common Germanic term (cf. Old Saxon sneppa, Middle Dutch snippe, Dutch snip, Old High German snepfa, German Schnepfe “snipe,” Swedish snäppa “sandpiper”), perhaps originally “snipper.” The Old English name was snite, which is of uncertain derivation. An opprobrious term (cf. guttersnipe) since c.1600.
v.

“shoot from a hidden place,” 1773 (among British soldiers in India), in reference to hunting snipe as game, from snipe (n.). Figurative use from 1892. Related: Sniped; sniping.

adjective

Furtive; shifty; deceptive: I never trusted that sneaky little weasel (1833+)

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