Commuted



[kuh-myoot] /kəˈmyut/

verb (used with object), commuted, commuting.
1.
to change (a prison sentence or other penalty) to a less severe one:
The death sentence was commuted to life imprisonment.
2.
to exchange for another or for something else; give and take reciprocally; interchange.
3.
to change:
to commute base metal into gold.
4.
to change (one kind of payment) into or for another, as by substitution.
verb (used without object), commuted, commuting.
5.
to travel regularly over some distance, as from a suburb into a city and back:
He commutes to work by train.
6.
to make substitution.
7.
to serve as a substitute.
8.
to make a collective payment, especially of a reduced amount, as an equivalent for a number of payments.
9.
Mathematics. to give the same result whether operating on the left or on the right.
noun
10.
a trip made by commuting:
It’s a long commute from his home to his office.
11.
an act or instance of commuting.
/kəˈmjuːt/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to travel some distance regularly between one’s home and one’s place of work
2.
(transitive) to substitute; exchange
3.
(transitive) (law) to reduce (a sentence) to one less severe
4.
to pay (an annuity) at one time, esp with a discount, instead of in instalments
5.
(transitive) to transform; change: to commute base metal into gold
6.
(intransitive) to act as or be a substitute
7.
(intransitive) to make a substitution; change
noun
8.
a journey made by commuting
v.

mid-15c., “to change, transform,” from Latin commutare “to often change, to change altogether,” from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + mutare “to change” (see mutable). Sense of “make less severe” is 1630s. Sense of “go back and forth to work” is 1889, from commutation ticket “season pass” (on a railroad, streetcar line, etc.), from commute in its sense of “to change one kind of payment into another” (1795), especially “to combine a number of payments into a single one.” Related: Commuted; commuting.
commute
(kə-myt’)
To yield the same result regardless of order. For example, numbers commute under addition, which is a commutative operation. Generally, any two operators H and G commute if their commutator is zero, i.e. HG – GH = 0.

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