Conning



[kon] /kɒn/

verb (used with object)
1.
3 (def 1).
noun
2.
responsibility for the steering of a ship.
3.
3 (defs 2, 3).
[kon] /kɒn/
verb (used with object), conned, conning.
1.
to learn; study; peruse or examine carefully.
2.
to commit to memory.
[kon] /kɒn/ Nautical
verb (used with object), conned, conning.
1.
to direct the steering of (a ship).
noun
2.
the station of the person who cons.
3.
the act of conning.
[kon] /kɒn/ Informal.
adjective
1.
involving abuse of :
a con trick.
verb (used with object), conned, conning.
2.
to swindle; trick:
That crook conned me out of all my savings.
3.
to persuade by deception, cajolery, etc.
noun
4.
a or swindle.
5.
a lie, exaggeration, or glib self-serving talk:
He had a dozen different cons for getting out of paying traffic tickets.
[kon] /kɒn/
verb (used with object), conned, conning. British Dialect.
1.
to strike, hit, or rap (something or someone).
2.
to hammer (a nail or peg).
3.
to beat or thrash a person with the hands or a weapon.
/kɒn/
noun
1.

verb cons, conning, conned
2.
(transitive) to swindle or defraud
/kɒn/
noun (usually pl)
1.
an argument or vote against a proposal, motion, etc
2.
a person who argues or votes against a proposal, motion, etc
/kɒn/
noun
1.
(slang) short for convict
/kɒn/
verb cons, conns, conning, conned
1.
(transitive) to direct the steering of (a vessel)
noun
2.
the place where a person who cons a vessel is stationed
/kɒn/
verb cons, conning, conned
1.
(transitive) (archaic) to study attentively or learn (esp in the phrase con by rote)
/kɒn/
preposition
1.
(music) with
/kɒn/
verb, noun
1.
a variant spelling (esp US) of con4
/kɒn/
noun
1.
2nd century ad, king of Leinster and high king of Ireland
n.

“negation” (mainly in pro and con), 1570s, short for Latin contra “against” (see contra).

“study,” early 15c., from Old English cunnan “to know, know how” (see can (v.1)).

a slang or colloquial shortening of various nouns beginning in con-, e.g., from the 19th century, confidant, conundrum, conformist, convict, contract, and from the 20th century, conductor, conservative.
adj.

“swindling,” 1889, American English, from confidence man (1849), from the many scams in which the victim is induced to hand over money as a token of confidence. Confidence with a sense of “assurance based on insufficient grounds” dates from 1590s.
v.

“to guide ships,” 1620s, from French conduire “to conduct, lead, guide” (10c.), from Latin conducere (see conduce). Related: Conned; conning.

“to swindle,” 1896, from con (adj.). Related: Conned; conning.

noun

A convict or former convict; prison inmate: You’re a ”con,” you’ve no rights (1893+)

noun

verb

1.
confidence game
2.
convict
certificate of need

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