Conniption



[kuh-nip-shuh n] /kəˈnɪp ʃən/

noun
1.
Often, conniptions. Informal. a fit of hysterical excitement or anger.
/kəˈnɪpʃən/
noun
1.
(often pl) (US & Canadian, slang) a fit of rage or tantrums
n.

1833, American English, origin uncertain; perhaps related to corruption, which was used in a sense of “anger” from 1799, or from English dialectal canapshus “ill-tempered, captious,” probably a corruption of captious.

noun phrase

A violent tantrum; hysterics; Catfit, duck-fit: Please don’t throw a conniption fit over the news

[first form 1833+, second 1848+; origin unknown; the later term catnip fit is a stab at folk etymology]
see: have a fit (conniption)

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