Conquered



[kong-ker] /ˈkɒŋ kər/

verb (used with object)
1.
to acquire by force of arms; win in war:
to conquer a foreign land.
2.
to overcome by force; subdue:
to conquer an enemy.
3.
to gain, win, or obtain by effort, personal appeal, etc.:
conquer the hearts of his audience.
4.
to gain a victory over; surmount; master; overcome:
to conquer disease and poverty; to conquer one’s fear.
verb (used without object)
5.
to be victorious; make ; gain the victory:
Despite their differences, their love will conquer.
/ˈkɒŋkə/
verb
1.
to overcome (an enemy, army, etc); defeat
2.
to overcome (an obstacle, feeling, desire, etc); surmount
3.
(transitive) to gain possession or control of by or as if by force or war; win
4.
(transitive) to gain the love, sympathy, etc, of (someone) by seduction or force of personality
v.

c.1200, cunquearen, from Old French conquerre “conquer, defeat, vanquish,” from Vulgar Latin *conquaerere (for Latin conquirere) “to search for, procure by effort, win,” from Latin com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + quaerere “to seek, gain” (see query (v.)). Related: Conquered; conquering.
see: divide and conquer

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Conquerer

    n. obsolete form of conqueror; see -er.

  • Conquering

    [kong-ker] /ˈkɒŋ kər/ verb (used with object) 1. to acquire by force of arms; win in war: to conquer a foreign land. 2. to overcome by force; subdue: to conquer an enemy. 3. to gain, win, or obtain by effort, personal appeal, etc.: conquer the hearts of his audience. 4. to gain a victory over; […]



  • Conqueror

    [kong-ker-er] /ˈkɒŋ kər ər/ noun 1. a person who or vanquishes; victor. /ˈkɒŋkərə/ noun 1. William the. See William I n. c.1300, from Anglo-French conquerour, Old French conquereor, from Old French conquerre (see conquer). Another early form was conquestor. William the Conqueror so called from early 12c. in Anglo-Latin: Guillelmus Magus id est conquæstor rex […]

  • Conquerors

    [kong-ker-er] /ˈkɒŋ kər ər/ noun 1. a person who or vanquishes; victor. /ˈkɒŋkərə/ noun 1. William the. See William I n. c.1300, from Anglo-French conquerour, Old French conquereor, from Old French conquerre (see conquer). Another early form was conquestor. William the Conqueror so called from early 12c. in Anglo-Latin: Guillelmus Magus id est conquæstor rex […]



Disclaimer: Conquered definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.