Conscience



[kon-shuh ns] /ˈkɒn ʃəns/

noun
1.
the inner sense of what is right or wrong in one’s conduct or motives, impelling one toward right action:
to follow the dictates of conscience.
2.
the complex of ethical and moral principles that controls or inhibits the actions or thoughts of an individual.
3.
an inhibiting sense of what is prudent:
I’d eat another piece of pie but my conscience would bother me.
4.
.
5.
Obsolete. consciousness; self-knowledge.
6.
Obsolete. strict and reverential observance.
Idioms
7.
have something on one’s conscience, to feel guilty about something, as an act that one considers wrong:
She behaves as if she had something on her conscience.
8.
in all conscience,

Also, in conscience.
/ˈkɒnʃəns/
noun
1.

2.
conscientiousness; diligence
3.
a feeling of guilt or anxiety: he has a conscience about his unkind action
4.
(obsolete) consciousness
5.
in conscience, in all conscience

6.
on one’s conscience, causing feelings of guilt or remorse
n.

early 13c., from Old French conscience “conscience, innermost thoughts, desires, intentions; feelings” (12c.), from Latin conscientia “knowledge within oneself, sense of right, a moral sense,” from conscientem (nominative consciens), present participle of conscire “be (mutually) aware,” from com- “with,” or “thoroughly” (see com-) + scire “to know” (see science).

Probably a loan-translation of Greek syneidesis, literally “with-knowledge.” Sometimes nativized in Old English/Middle English as inwit. Russian also uses a loan-translation, so-vest, “conscience,” literally “with-knowledge.”

conscience con·science (kŏn’shəns)
n.

that faculty of the mind, or inborn sense of right and wrong, by which we judge of the moral character of human conduct. It is common to all men. Like all our other faculties, it has been perverted by the Fall (John 16:2; Acts 26:9; Rom. 2:15). It is spoken of as “defiled” (Titus 1:15), and “seared” (1 Tim. 4:2). A “conscience void of offence” is to be sought and cultivated (Acts 24:16; Rom. 9:1; 2 Cor. 1:12; 1 Tim. 1:5, 19; 1 Pet. 3:21).

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