Coopers



[koo-per, koo p-er] /ˈku pər, ˈkʊp ər/

noun
1.
a person who makes or repairs casks, barrels, etc.
verb (used with object)
2.
to make or repair (casks, barrels, etc.).
3.
to furnish or fix (usually followed by up).
verb (used without object)
4.
to work as a cooper.
[noun, adverb koh-op; verb koh-op, koh-op] /noun, adverb ˈkoʊ ɒp; verb ˈkoʊ ɒp, koʊˈɒp/
noun
1.
a cooperative store, dwelling, program, etc.
verb (used with object), co-oped or co-opped, co-oping or co-opping.
2.
to place in a cooperative arrangement, especially to convert (an apartment or building) to a cooperative.
adjective
3.
(of a game, especially a video game) cooperative, requiring players to work together to achieve a common objective: co-op play modes;
co-op multiplayer games.
Idioms
4.
go co-op, to convert to a cooperative:
Our apartment building is going co-op.
/ˈkuːpə/
noun
1.
Also called hooper. a person skilled in making and repairing barrels, casks, etc
verb
2.
(transitive) to make or mend (barrels, casks, etc)
3.
(intransitive) to work as a cooper
/ˈkuːpə/
noun
1.
Anthony Ashley. See (Earl of) Shaftesbury
2.
Cary (Lynn). born 1940, British psychologist, noted for his studies of behaviour at work and the causes and treatment of stress
3.
Gary, real name Frank James Cooper. 1901–61, US film actor; his many films include Sergeant York (1941) and High Noon (1952), for both of which he won Oscars
4.
Sir Henry. 1934–2011, British boxer; European heavyweight champion (1964; 1968–71)
5.
James Fenimore 1789–1851, US novelist, noted for his stories of American Indians, esp The Last of the Mohicans (1826)
6.
Leon Neil. born 1930, US physicist, noted for his work on the theory of superconductivity. He shared the Nobel prize for physics 1972
7.
Samuel 1609–72, English miniaturist
n.

“craftsman who makes wooden vessels,” attested from late 12c. as a surname, either from Old English (unattested) or from a Low German source akin to Middle Dutch cuper, East Frisian kuper, from Low German kupe (German Kufe) “cask,” cognate with Medieval Latin cupa (see coop (n.)).

A dry cooper makes casks, etc., to hold dry goods, a wet cooper those to contain liquids, a white cooper pails, tubs, and the like for domestic or dairy use. [OED]

The surname Cowper (pronounced “cooper”) preserves a 15c. spelling.

n.

1861, abbreviation of cooperative. The hyphen is needed to avoid confusion with coop (n.).

modifier

: co-op prices/ coop apartment complex

noun

A cooperative apartment house, store, etc (1870s+)

verb

To convert an apartment or building from a rental to a cooperative unit: The old Sussex Arms got co-oped last year (1950s+)
cooperative

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