Cornet



[kawr-net for 1; kawr-nit, kawr-net for 2–8] /kɔrˈnɛt for 1; ˈkɔr nɪt, kɔrˈnɛt for 2–8/

noun
1.
Music. a valved wind instrument of the trumpet family.
2.
a small cone of paper twisted at the end and used for holding candy, nuts, etc.
3.
a pastry cone, usually filled with whipped cream.
4.
British. a conical wafer, as for ice cream; cone.
5.
a large, white, winged headdress formerly worn by the members of the Sisters of Charity.
6.
a woman’s headdress, often cone-shaped, usually of delicate fabrics and having lappets of lace or other material, worn by women from the 14th to the 18th century.
7.
a pennant or flag used for signaling in a navy.
8.
(formerly) the officer who carried the colors in a troop of cavalry:
the cornet of horse.
/ˈkɔːnɪt/
noun
1.
Also called cornet à pistons (ˈkɔːnɪt ə ˈpɪstənz; French) (kɔrnɛ a pistɔ̃). a three-valved brass instrument of the trumpet family. Written range: about two and a half octaves upwards from E below middle C. It is a transposing instrument in B flat or A
2.
a person who plays the cornet
3.
a variant spelling of cornett
4.
a cone-shaped paper container for sweets, etc
5.
(Brit) a cone-shaped wafer container for ice cream
6.
(formerly) the lowest rank of commissioned cavalry officer in the British army
7.
(South African) short for field cornet
8.
a starched and wired muslin or lace cap worn by women from the 12th to the 15th centuries
9.
the large white headdress of some nuns
n.

c.1400, “A wind instrument made of wood and provided with six finger holes” [Middle English Dictionary], from Old French cornet (14c.) “a small horn,” diminutive of corn “a horn,” from Latin cornu “horn” (see horn (n.)). Modern use is short for cornet-à-pistons “cornet with pistons.”

The quality of the tone is penetrating and unsympathetic, by no means equal to that of the trumpet, for which it is commonly substituted. [“cornet” entry in “Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia,” 1902]

Heb. shophar, “brightness,” with reference to the clearness of its sound (1 Chr. 15:28; 2 Chr. 15:14; Ps. 98:6; Hos. 5:8). It is usually rendered in the Authorized Version “trumpet.” It denotes the long and straight horn, about eighteen inches long. The words of Joel, “Blow the trumpet,” literally, “Sound the cornet,” refer to the festival which was the preparation for the day of Atonement. In Dan. 3:5, 7, 10, 15, the word (keren) so rendered is a curved horn. The word “cornet” in 2 Sam. 6:5 (Heb. mena’an’im, occurring only here) was some kind of instrument played by being shaken like the Egyptian sistrum, consisting of rings or bells hung loosely on iron rods.

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