Craps



[kraps] /kræps/

noun, (usually used with a singular verb)
1.
a game in which two dice are thrown and in which a first throw of 7 or 11 wins, a first throw of 2, 3, or 12 loses, and a first throw of 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10 can be won only by throwing the same number again before throwing a 7.
[krap] /kræp/
noun
1.
Vulgar.

2.
Slang: Sometimes Vulgar.

3.
refuse; rubbish; junk; litter:
Will you clean up that crap!
verb (used without object), crapped, crapping.
4.
Vulgar. to defecate.
verb (used with object), crapped, crapping.
5.
Slang: Sometimes Vulgar. to talk nonsense to; attempt to deceive.
Verb phrases
6.
crap around, Slang: Sometimes Vulgar.

7.
crap on, Slang: Sometimes Vulgar.

8.
crap up, Slang: Sometimes Vulgar. to botch, ruin, or cheapen; make a mess of.
[krap] /kræp/
noun
1.
(in craps) a losing throw, in which the total on the two dice is 2, 3, or 12.
2.
.
Verb phrases, past and past participle crapped, present participle crapping.
3.
crap out,

/kræps/
noun (usually functioning as sing)
1.
a gambling game using two dice, in which a player wins the bet if 7 or 11 is thrown first, and loses if 2, 3, or 12 is thrown
2.
shoot craps, to play this game
/kræp/
noun
1.
a losing throw in the game of craps
2.
another name for craps
/kræp/
noun
1.
nonsense
2.
rubbish
3.
another word for faeces
verb craps, crapping, crapped
4.
(intransitive) another word for defecate
n.

1843, American English, unrelated to the term for excrement, instead it is from Louisiana French craps “the game of hazard,” from an 18c. continental French corruption of English crabs, which was 18c. slang for “a throw of two or three” (the lowest throw), which perhaps is from crab (n.2), the sense in crab apple. The 1843 citation (in an anti-gambling publication) calls it “a game lately introduced into New Orleans.”
v.

“defecate,” 1846, from one of a cluster of words generally applied to things cast off or discarded (e.g. “weeds growing among corn” (early 15c.), “residue from renderings” (late 15c.), underworld slang for “money” (18c.), and in Shropshire, “dregs of beer or ale”), all probably from Middle English crappe “grain that was trodden underfoot in a barn, chaff” (mid-15c.), from Middle French crape “siftings,” from Old French crappe, from Medieval Latin crappa, crapinum “chaff.” Related: Crapped; crapping.

Despite folk etymology insistence, not from Thomas Crapper (1837-1910) who was, however, a busy plumber and may have had some minor role in the development of modern toilets. The name Crapper is a northern form of Cropper (attested from 1221), an occupational surname, obviously, but the exact reference is unclear.
n.

“act of defecation,” 1898; see crap (v.). Sense of “rubbish, nonsense” also first recorded 1898.

interjection

An exclamation of disbelief, disgust, disappointment, rejection, etc; fuck, shit: Oh, crap, I broke it again (1930s+)

noun

verb

Related Terms

all that kind of crap, full of shit, shoot the bull

[by extension fr Middle English crap, ”chaff, siftings of grain, residue”]

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