Crock



[krok] /krɒk/

noun
1.
an earthenware pot, jar, or other container.
2.
a fragment of earthenware; potsherd.
[krok] /krɒk/
noun
1.
a person or thing that is old, decrepit, or broken-down.
2.
Slang. a person who complains about or insists on being treated for an imagined illness.
3.
an old ewe.
4.
an old worn-out horse.
verb (used with object)
5.
British Slang. to disable or injure.
[krok] /krɒk/
noun
1.
British Dialect. soot; smut.
2.
excess surface dye from imperfectly dyed cloth.
verb (used with object)
3.
British Dialect. to soil with soot.
verb (used without object)
4.
(of cloth) to give off excess surface dye when rubbed.
[krok] /krɒk/
noun, Slang.
1.
a lie; exaggeration; nonsense:
The entire story is just a crock.
/krɒk/
noun
1.
an earthen pot, jar, etc
2.
a piece of broken earthenware
3.
(US & Canadian, informal) Also crock of shit. a quantity or source of lies or nonsense
/krɒk/
noun
1.
(slang, mainly Brit) a person or thing, such as a car, that is old or decrepit (esp in the phrase old crock)
2.
an old broken-down horse or ewe
verb
3.
(slang, mainly Brit) to become or cause to become weak or disabled
/krɒk/
noun
1.
(dialect, mainly Brit) soot or smut
2.
colour that rubs off fabric
verb
3.
(transitive) (dialect, mainly Brit) to soil with or as if with soot
4.
(intransitive) (of a dyed fabric) to release colour when rubbed, as a result of imperfect dyeing
n.

Old English crocc, crocca “pot, vessel,” from Proto-Germanic *krogu “pitcher, pot” (cf. Old Frisian krocha “pot,” Old Saxon kruka, Middle Dutch cruke, Dutch kruik, Old High German kruog “pitcher,” German Krug, Old Norse krukka “pot”). Perhaps from the same source as Middle Irish crocan “pot,” Greek krossos “pitcher,” Old Church Slavonic krugla “cup.” Used as an image of worthless rubbish since 19c., perhaps from the use of crockery as chamberpots.

noun

verb

[American scatologism “crock of shit”] 1. An awkward feature or programming technique that ought to be made cleaner. For example, using small integers to represent error codes without the program interpreting them to the user (as in, for example, Unix “make(1)”, which returns code 139 for a process that dies due to segfault).
2. A technique that works acceptably, but which is quite prone to failure if disturbed in the least. For example, a too-clever programmer might write an assembler which mapped instruction mnemonics to numeric opcodes algorithmically, a trick which depends far too intimately on the particular bit patterns of the opcodes. (For another example of programming with a dependence on actual opcode values, see The Story of Mel.) Many crocks have a tightly woven, almost completely unmodifiable structure. See kluge, brittle. The adjectives “crockish” and “crocky”, and the nouns “crockishness” and “crockitude”, are also used.
[Jargon File]

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Crocidolite

    [kroh-sid-l-ahyt] /kroʊˈsɪd lˌaɪt/ noun, Mineralogy. 1. a bluish, asbestine variety of riebeckite. /krəʊˈsɪdəˌlaɪt/ noun 1. a blue fibrous amphibole mineral consisting of sodium iron silicate: a variety of asbestos used in cement products and pressure piping

  • Crochet-hook

    noun 1. a needle with a hook at one end, used in crochet.



  • Crochetwork

    [kroh-shey-wurk; British kroh-shey-wurk, -shee-] /kroʊˈʃeɪˌwɜrk; British ˈkroʊ ʃeɪˌwɜrk, -ʃi-/ noun 1. needlework done by .

  • Cross-compound

    [kraws-kom-pound, kros-] /ˈkrɔsˈkɒm paʊnd, ˈkrɒs-/ adjective 1. (of a compound engine or turbine) having the high-pressure and low-pressure units side by side.



Disclaimer: Crock definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.