Cynicism



disposition, character, or belief.
a remark.
(initial capital letter) any of the doctrines or practices of the Cynics.
Contemporary Examples

The cynicism of the American electorate is nothing compared to that of its Italian counterpart.
Berlusconi Burlesque Alex Massie September 22, 2009

In the U.S., however, the twin reactions to his advice have been: disinterest and cynicism.
What the Secret Documents Reveal Dr. Cheryl Benard November 3, 2010

But Sciortino cut her teeth in that world of excess irony, cynicism, and posturing.
Is This Dildo-Licking, Dominatrix-Loving Vogue Blogger the New Face of Feminism? Lizzie Crocker May 21, 2014

Israelis who believe in peace must shake off their fatigue and cynicism and say: NO.
Savoring The Afterglow Of Obama’s Speech Lara Friedman March 20, 2013

After Vietnam, it was axiomatic that the press would approach those in power with a skepticism verging on cynicism.
Nixon, Obama, and How We Lost Trust in the U.S. Government Stuart Stevens October 30, 2013

Historical Examples

The disregard of these common decencies lays him open to the charges of cruelty, cynicism, hardness.
Notes on Life and Letters Joseph Conrad

The development of living ideals is not in an atmosphere of cynicism.
The Call of the Twentieth Century David Starr Jordan

It will confirm Mr. Beverly in his cynicism regarding her want of taste.
Lippincott’s Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 22. October, 1878. Various

From vanity he spoke of himself in the highest terms and from cynicism in the lowest.
Initiation into Philosophy Emile Faguet

He had listened in silence to the others, his rather thick but expressive lips curving with cynicism.
The Last Shot Frederick Palmer

noun
the attitude or beliefs of a cynic
a cynical action, remark, idea, etc
noun
the doctrines of the Cynics
n.

1670s, “philosophy of the Cynics,” from cynic + -ism. Meaning “cynical character” is from 1847. For nuances of usage of cynicism, see humor.

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