[dwelt] /dwɛlt/

a simple past tense and past participle of .
[dwel] /dwɛl/
verb (used without object), dwelt or dwelled, dwelling.
to live or stay as a permanent resident; reside.
to live or continue in a given condition or state:
to dwell in happiness.
to linger over, emphasize, or ponder in thought, speech, or writing (often followed by on or upon):
to dwell on a particular point in an argument.
(of a moving tool or machine part) to be motionless for a certain interval during operation.

a past tense of dwell
verb (intransitive) dwells, dwelling, dwelt (dwɛlt), dwelled
(formal, literary) to live as a permanent resident
to live (in a specified state): to dwell in poverty
a regular pause in the operation of a machine
a flat or constant-radius portion on a linear or rotary cam enabling the cam follower to remain static for a brief time

Old English dwellan “to mislead, deceive,” originally “to make a fool of, lead astray,” from Proto-Germanic *dwaljanan (cf. Old Norse dvöl “delay,” dvali “sleep;” Middle Dutch dwellen “to stun, make giddy, perplex;” Old High German twellen “to hinder, delay;” Danish dvale “trance, stupor,” dvaelbær “narcotic berry,” source of Middle English dwale “nightshade”), from PIE *dhwel-, from root *dheu- (1) “dust, cloud, vapor, smoke” (and related notions of “defective perception or wits”).

Related to Old English gedweola “error, heresy, madness.” Sense shifted in Middle English through “hinder, delay,” to “linger” (c.1200, as still in phrase to dwell upon), to “make a home” (mid-13c.). Related: Dwelled; dwelt; dwells.

Tents were in primitive times the common dwellings of men. Houses were afterwards built, the walls of which were frequently of mud (Job 24:16; Matt. 6:19, 20) or of sun-dried bricks. God “dwells in light” (1 Tim. 6:16; 1 John 1:7), in heaven (Ps. 123:1), in his church (Ps. 9:11; 1 John 4:12). Christ dwelt on earth in the days of his humiliation (John 1:14). He now dwells in the hearts of his people (Eph. 3:17-19). The Holy Spirit dwells in believers (1 Cor. 3:16; 2 Tim. 1:14). We are exhorted to “let the word of God dwell in us richly” (Col. 3:16; Ps. 119:11). Dwell deep occurs only in Jer. 49:8, and refers to the custom of seeking refuge from impending danger, in retiring to the recesses of rocks and caverns, or to remote places in the desert.


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  • DWI

    1. driving while intoxicated: often used as an official police abbreviation. 1. died without issue 2. driving while intoxicated

  • Dwight

    [dwahyt] /dwaɪt/ noun 1. Timothy, 1826–1916, U.S. ecclesiastic: president of Yale University 1886–98. 2. a male given name: from an Anglo-French surname meaning “of the Isle of Wight.”.

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