Eagle



[ee-guh l] /ˈi gəl/

noun
1.
any of several large, soaring birds of prey belonging to the hawk family Accipitridae, noted for their size, strength, and powers of flight and vision: formerly widespread in North America, eagles are mostly confined to Alaska and a few isolated populations.
Compare , .
2.
a figure or representation of an eagle, much used as an emblem:
the Roman eagle.
3.
a standard, seal, or the like bearing such a figure.
4.
one of a pair of silver insignia in the shape of eagles with outstretched wings worn by a colonel in the U.S. Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps and by a captain in the U.S. Navy.
5.
(initial capital letter) a gold coin of the U.S., traded for investment, available in denominations of 5, 10, 25, and 50 dollars containing 1/10 to 1 troy ounce of gold, having on its reverse a picture of an eagle: first issued in 1986.
6.
a former gold coin of the U.S., issued until 1933, equal to 10 dollars, showing an eagle on its reverse.
7.
Golf. a score of two below par for any single hole.
8.
(initial capital letter) Astronomy. the constellation Aquila.
9.
Cards.

verb (used with object), eagled, eagling.
10.
Golf. to make an eagle on (a hole).
/ˈiːɡəl/
noun
1.
any of various birds of prey of the genera Aquila, Harpia, etc, having large broad wings and strong soaring flight: family Accipitridae (hawks, etc) See also golden eagle, harpy eagle, sea eagle related adjective aquiline
2.
a representation of an eagle used as an emblem, etc, esp representing power: the Roman eagle
3.
a standard, seal, etc, bearing the figure of an eagle
4.
(golf) a score of two strokes under par for a hole
5.
a former US gold coin worth ten dollars: withdrawn from circulation in 1934
6.
the shoulder insignia worn by a US full colonel or equivalent rank
verb
7.
(golf) to score two strokes under par for a hole
n.

mid-14c., from Old French egle, from Old Provençal aigla, from Latin aquila “black eagle,” fem. of aquilus, often explained as “dark colored” (bird); see aquiline. The native term was erne. Golf score sense is first recorded by 1908 (according to old golf sources, because it “soars higher” than a birdie). The figurative eagle-eyed is attested from c.1600.

noun

A US one-dollar bill

Related Terms

legal eagle

[fr the eagle pictured on the back]

A dBASE-like dialect bundled with Emerald Bay, sold by Migent from 1986-1988, later renamed Vulcan when Wayne Ratliff reacquired the product.

(Herb. nesher; properly the griffon vulture or great vulture, so called from its tearing its prey with its beak), referred to for its swiftness of flight (Deut. 28:49; 2 Sam. 1:23), its mounting high in the air (Job 39:27), its strength (Ps. 103:5), its setting its nest in high places (Jer. 49:16), and its power of vision (Job 39:27-30). This “ravenous bird” is a symbol of those nations whom God employs and sends forth to do a work of destruction, sweeping away whatever is decaying and putrescent (Matt. 24:28; Isa. 46:11; Ezek. 39:4; Deut. 28:49; Jer. 4:13; 48:40). It is said that the eagle sheds his feathers in the beginning of spring, and with fresh plumage assumes the appearance of youth. To this, allusion is made in Ps. 103:5 and Isa. 40:31. God’s care over his people is likened to that of the eagle in training its young to fly (Ex. 19:4; Deut. 32:11, 12). An interesting illustration is thus recorded by Sir Humphry Davy:, “I once saw a very interesting sight above the crags of Ben Nevis. Two parent eagles were teaching their offspring, two young birds, the maneuvers of flight. They began by rising from the top of the mountain in the eye of the sun. It was about mid-day, and bright for the climate. They at first made small circles, and the young birds imitated them. They paused on their wings, waiting till they had made their flight, and then took a second and larger gyration, always rising toward the sun, and enlarging their circle of flight so as to make a gradually ascending spiral. The young ones still and slowly followed, apparently flying better as they mounted; and they continued this sublime exercise, always rising till they became mere points in the air, and the young ones were lost, and afterwards their parents, to our aching sight.” (See Isa. 40:31.) There have been observed in Palestine four distinct species of eagles, (1) the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos); (2) the spotted eagle (Aquila naevia); (3) the common species, the imperial eagle (Aquila heliaca); and (4) the Circaetos gallicus, which preys on reptiles. The eagle was unclean by the Levitical law (Lev. 11:13; Deut. 14:12).

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  • Eagle-eyed

    [ee-guh l-ahyd] /ˈi gəlˌaɪd/ adjective 1. having keen vision. adjective 1. having keen or piercing eyesight adjective



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