Edgeways



[ej-wahyz] /ˈɛdʒˌwaɪz/

adverb
1.
with the forward; in the direction of the .
2.
.
Idioms
3.
get a word in edgewise, to succeed in entering a conversation or expressing one’s opinion in spite of competition or opposition:
There were so many people talking at once that I couldn’t get a word in edgewise.
/ˈɛdʒˌweɪz/
adverb
1.
with the edge forwards or uppermost: they carried the piano in edgeways
2.
on, by, with, or towards the edge: he held it edgeways
3.
(usually used with a negative) get a word in edgeways, to succeed in interrupting a conversation in which someone else is talking incessantly
adv.

also edge-ways, 1560s, from edge (n.) + way. First attested form of the word is edgewaie; the adverbial genitive -s appears by 1640s. Edgewise (1715) appears to be a variant, based on otherwise, etc. See edge (v.).

As if it were possible for any of us to slide in a word edgewise! [Mary Mitford, “Our Village,” 1824].

To edge in a word in this sense is from 1680s.

see edgeways.
see: get a word in edgewise

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