Equinoctial-year



noun
1.
(def 4b).
[yeer] /yɪər/
noun
1.
a period of 365 or 366 days, in the Gregorian calendar, divided into 12 calendar months, now reckoned as beginning Jan. 1 and ending Dec. 31 (calendar year or civil year)
Compare , .
2.
a period of approximately the same length in other calendars.
3.
a space of 12 calendar months calculated from any point:
This should have been finished a year ago.
4.
Astronomy.

5.
the time in which any planet completes a revolution round the sun:
the Martian year.
6.
a full round of the seasons.
7.
a period out of every 12 months, devoted to a certain pursuit, activity, or the like:
the academic year.
8.
years.

9.
a group of students entering school or college, graduating, or expecting to graduate in the same year; class.
Idioms
10.
a year and a day, a period specified as the limit of time in various legal matters, as in determining a right or a liability, to allow for a full year by any way of counting.
11.
from the year one, for a very long time; as long as anyone remembers:
He’s been with the company from the year one.
12.
year in and year out, regularly through the years; continually:
Year in and year out they went to Florida for the winter.
Also, year in, year out.
/jɪə/
noun
1.
Also called civil year. the period of time, the calendar year, containing 365 days or in a leap year 366 days. It is based on the Gregorian calendar, being divided into 12 calendar months, and is reckoned from January 1 to December 31
2.
a period of twelve months from any specified date, such as one based on the four seasons
3.
a specific period of time, usually occupying a definite part or parts of a twelve-month period, used for some particular activity: a school year
4.
Also called astronomical year, tropical year. the period of time, the solar year, during which the earth makes one revolution around the sun, measured between two successive vernal equinoxes: equal to 365.242 19 days
5.
the period of time, the sidereal year, during which the earth makes one revolution around the sun, measured between two successive conjunctions of a particular distant star: equal to 365.256 36 days
6.
the period of time, the lunar year, containing 12 lunar months and equal to 354.3671 days
7.
the period of time taken by a specified planet to complete one revolution around the sun: the Martian year
8.
(pl) age, esp old age: a man of his years should be more careful
9.
(pl) time: in years to come
10.
a group of pupils or students, who are taught or study together, divided into classes at school: they are the best year we’ve ever had for history
11.
(informal) the year dot, as long ago as can be remembered
12.
(English law) year and a day, a period fixed by law to ensure the completion of a full year. It is applied for certain purposes, such as to determine the time within which wrecks must be claimed
13.
year in, year out, regularly or monotonously, over a long period
n.

Old English gear (West Saxon), ger (Anglian) “year,” from Proto-Germanic *jæram “year” (cf. Old Saxon, Old High German jar, Old Norse ar, Danish aar, Old Frisian ger, Dutch jaar, German Jahr, Gothic jer “year”), from PIE *yer-o-, from root *yer-/*yor- “year, season” (cf. Avestan yare (nominative singular) “year;” Greek hora “year, season, any part of a year,” also “any part of a day, hour;” Old Church Slavonic jaru, Bohemian jaro “spring;” Latin hornus “of this year;” Old Persian dušiyaram “famine,” literally “bad year”). Probably originally “that which makes [a complete cycle],” and from verbal root *ei- meaning “to do, make.”

noun

The screaming and wavering warning signal used on police cars, ambulances, and other emergency vehicles: two police cars going north with yelpers wide open (1970s+)

Heb. shanah, meaning “repetition” or “revolution” (Gen. 1:14; 5:3). Among the ancient Egyptians the year consisted of twelve months of thirty days each, with five days added to make it a complete revolution of the earth round the sun. The Jews reckoned the year in two ways, (1) according to a sacred calendar, in which the year began about the time of the vernal equinox, with the month Abib; and (2) according to a civil calendar, in which the year began about the time of the autumnal equinox, with the month Nisan. The month Tisri is now the beginning of the Jewish year.

In addition to the idiom beginning with
year

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