Excess



[noun ik-ses, ek-ses; adjective, verb ek-ses, ik-ses] /noun ɪkˈsɛs, ˈɛk sɛs; adjective, verb ˈɛk sɛs, ɪkˈsɛs/

noun
1.
the fact of something else in amount or degree:
His strength is in excess of yours.
2.
the amount or degree by which one thing another:
The bill showed an excess of several hundred dollars over the estimate.
3.
an extreme or amount or degree; superabundance:
to have an excess of energy.
4.
a going beyond what is regarded as customary or proper:
to talk to excess.
5.
immoderate indulgence; intemperance in eating, drinking, etc.
adjective
6.
more than or above what is necessary, usual, or specified; extra:
a charge for excess baggage; excess profits.
verb (used with object)
7.
to dismiss, demote, transfer, or furlough (an employee), especially as part of a mass layoff.
noun (ɪkˈsɛs; ˈɛksɛs)
1.
the state or act of going beyond normal, sufficient, or permitted limits
2.
an immoderate or abnormal amount, number, extent, or degree too much or too many: an excess of tolerance
3.
the amount, number, extent, or degree by which one thing exceeds another
4.
(chem) a quantity of a reagent that is greater than the quantity required to complete a reaction: add an excess of acid
5.
overindulgence or intemperance
6.
(insurance, mainly Brit) a specified contribution towards the cost of a claim, stipulated on certain insurance policies as being payable by the policyholder
7.
in excess of, of more than; over
8.
to excess, to an inordinate extent; immoderately: he drinks to excess
adjective (usually prenominal) (ˈɛksɛs; ɪkˈsɛs)
9.
more than normal, necessary, or permitted; surplus: excess weight
10.
payable as a result of previous underpayment: excess postage, an excess fare for a railway journey
n.

late 14c., from Old French exces (14c.) “excess, extravagance, outrage,” from Latin excessus “departure, a going beyond the bounds of reason or beyond the subject,” from stem of excedere “to depart, go beyond” (see exceed). As an adjective from late 15c.

excess ex·cess (ĭk-sěs’, ěk’sěs’)
n.
An amount or quantity beyond what is normal or sufficient; a surplus.
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    [noun ik-ses, ek-ses; adjective, verb ek-ses, ik-ses] /noun ɪkˈsɛs, ˈɛk sɛs; adjective, verb ˈɛk sɛs, ɪkˈsɛs/ noun 1. the fact of something else in amount or degree: His strength is in excess of yours. 2. the amount or degree by which one thing another: The bill showed an excess of several hundred dollars over the […]

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