Fatigued



[fuh-teegd] /fəˈtigd/

adjective
1.
tired; wearied.
[fuh-teeg] /fəˈtig/
noun
1.
weariness from bodily or mental exertion.
2.
a cause of weariness; slow ordeal; exertion:
the fatigue of driving for many hours.
3.
Physiology. temporary diminution of the irritability or functioning of organs, tissues, or cells after excessive exertion or stimulation.
4.
Civil Engineering. the weakening or breakdown of material subjected to stress, especially a repeated series of stresses.
5.
Also called fatigue duty. Military.

6.
fatigues, Military. .
adjective
7.
of or relating to fatigues or any clothing made to resemble them:
The guerrilla band wore fatigue pants and field jackets. She brought fatigue shorts to wear on the hike.
verb (used with object), fatigued, fatiguing.
8.
to weary with bodily or mental exertion; exhaust the strength of:
Endless chatter fatigues me.
9.
Civil Engineering. to subject (a material) to fatigue.
verb (used without object), fatigued, fatiguing.
10.
to become .
11.
Civil Engineering. (of a material) to undergo fatigue.
/fəˈtiːɡ/
noun
1.
physical or mental exhaustion due to exertion
2.
a tiring activity or effort
3.
(physiol) the temporary inability of an organ or part to respond to a stimulus because of overactivity
4.
the progressive cracking of a material subjected to alternating stresses, esp vibrations
5.
the temporary inability to respond to a situation or perform a function, because of overexposure or overactivity: compassion fatigue
6.

7.
(pl) special clothing worn by military personnel to carry out such duties
verb -tigues, -tiguing, -tigued
8.
to make or become weary or exhausted
9.
to crack or break (a material or part) by inducing fluctuating stresses in it, or (of a metal or part) to become weakened or fail as a result of fluctuating stresses
n.

1660s, “that which causes weariness,” from French fatigue “weariness,” from fatiguer “to tire,” from Latin fatigare, originally “to cause to break down,” later, “to weary, fatigue, tire out,” from pre-Latin adj. *fati-agos “driving to the point of breakdown,” from Old Latin *fatis (of unknown origin, related to adv. affatim “sufficiently” and to fatisci “crack, split”) + root of agere “to drive” (see act (n.)). Meaning “weariness from exertion” is from 1719.
v.

1690s, from French fatiguer (15c.), from fatigue (see fatigue (n.). Earlier in same sense was fatigate (1530s). Related: Fatigued; fatiguing.

fatigue fa·tigue (fə-tēg’)
n.

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Read Also:

  • Fatigue fracture

    fatigue fracture n. A fracture, usually transverse in orientation, that occurs as a result of repeated or unusual endogenous stress.

  • Fatigue-life

    noun 1. the number of applications of a given stress to which a sample of metal can be subjected before failing.



  • Fatigue-limit

    noun 1. the maximum stress to which a material can be subjected without failing.

  • Fatigue-ratio

    noun 1. the ratio between the fatigue limit and the tensile strength of a material.



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