Fellow



[fel-oh] /ˈfɛl oʊ/

noun
1.
a man or boy:
a fine old fellow; a nice little fellow.
2.
Informal. beau; suitor:
Mary had her fellow over to meet her folks.
3.
Informal. person; one:
They don’t treat a fellow very well here.
4.
a person of small worth or no esteem.
5.
a companion; comrade; associate:
They have been fellows since childhood.
6.
a person belonging to the same rank or class; equal; peer:
The doctor conferred with his fellows.
7.
one of a pair; mate; match:
a shoe without its fellow.
8.
Education.

9.
a member of any of certain learned societies:
a fellow of the British Academy.
10.
Obsolete. a partner.
verb (used with object)
11.
to make or represent as equal with another.
12.
Archaic. to produce a fellow to; match.
adjective
13.
belonging to the same class or group; united by the same occupation, interests, etc.; being in the same condition:
fellow students; fellow sufferers.
/ˈfɛləʊ/
noun
1.
a man or boy
2.
an informal word for boyfriend
3.
(informal) one or oneself: a fellow has to eat
4.
a person considered to be of little importance or worth
5.

6.
(at Oxford and Cambridge universities) a member of the governing body of a college, who is usually a member of the teaching staff
7.
a member of the governing body or established teaching staff at any of various universities or colleges
8.
a postgraduate student employed, esp for a fixed period, to undertake research and, often, to do some teaching
9.

10.
one of a pair; counterpart; mate: looking for the glove’s fellow
/ˈfɛləʊ/
noun
1.
a member of any of various learned societies: Fellow of the British Academy
n.

c.1200, from Old English feolaga “fellow, partner,” from Old Norse felagi, from fe “money” (see fee) + verbal base denoting “lay” (see lay (v.)). Sense is of “one who puts down money with another in a joint venture.” Used familiarly since mid-15c. for “man, male person,” but not etymologically masculine.

University senses (mid-15c.), corresponding to Latin socius) evolved from notion of “one of the corporation who constitute a college” and who are paid from its revenues. First record of fellow-traveler in sense of “one who sympathizes with the Communist movement but is not a party member,” is from 1936, translating Russian poputchik. The literal sense is attested in English from 1610s.

Related Terms

regular fellow
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  • Fellowly

    [fel-oh-lee] /ˈfɛl oʊ li/ adjective 1. sociable or friendly. adverb 2. in a sociable or friendly manner.

  • Fellowman

    [fel-oh-man] /ˈfɛl oʊˈmæn/ noun, plural fellowmen. 1. another member of the human race, especially a kindred human being: Don’t deny full recognition to your fellowmen.



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