Fevered



[fee-ver] /ˈfi vər/

noun
1.
an abnormal condition of the body, characterized by undue rise in temperature, quickening of the pulse, and disturbance of various body functions.
2.
an abnormally high body temperature.
3.
the number of degrees of such a temperature above the normal.
4.
any of a group of diseases in which high temperature is a prominent symptom:
scarlet fever.
5.
intense nervous excitement:
The audience was in a fever of anticipation.
verb (used with object)
6.
to affect with or as with fever:
The excitement fevered him.
/ˈfiːvə/
noun
1.
an abnormally high body temperature, accompanied by a fast pulse rate, dry skin, etc related adjectives febrile pyretic
2.
any of various diseases, such as yellow fever or scarlet fever, characterized by a high temperature
3.
intense nervous excitement or agitation: she was in a fever about her party
verb
4.
(transitive) to affect with or as if with fever
n.

late Old English fefor, fefer “fever,” from Latin febris “fever,” related to fovere “to warm, heat,” probably from PIE root *dhegh- “burn” (cf. Gothic dags, Old English dæg “day,” originally “the heat”); but some suggest a reduplication of a root represented by Sanskrit *bhur- “to be restless.”

Adopted into most Germanic languages (cf. German Fieber, Swedish feber, Danish feber), but not in Dutch. English spelling influenced by Old French fievre. Replaced Old English hriðing. Extended sense of “intense nervous excitement” is from 1580s.

fever fe·ver (fē’vər)
n.

fever
(fē’vər)
A body temperature that is higher than normal. Fever is the body’s natural response to the release of substances called pyrogens by infectious agents such as bacteria and viruses. The pyrogens stimulate the hypothalamus in the brain to conserve heat and increase the basal metabolic rate.

noun

Related Terms

cabin fever

(Deut. 28:22; Matt. 8:14; Mark 1:30; John 4:52; Acts 28:8), a burning heat, as the word so rendered denotes, which attends all febrile attacks. In all Eastern countries such diseases are very common. Peter’s wife’s mother is said to have suffered from a “great fever” (Luke 4:38), an instance of Luke’s professional exactitude in describing disease. He adopts here the technical medical distinction, as in those times fevers were divided into the “great” and the “less.”

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    [fee-ver-fyoo] /ˈfi vərˌfyu/ noun 1. a bushy composite plant, Chrysanthemum parthenium, bearing small white flowers, formerly used as a remedy for fever and headache. /ˈfiːvəˌfjuː/ noun 1. a bushy European strong-scented perennial plant, Tanacetum parthenium, with white flower heads, formerly used medicinally: family Asteraceae (composites) n. Old English feferfuge, from Late Latin febrifugia, from Latin […]

  • Fever-heat

    noun 1. the heat of fever; body heat exceeding 98.6°F (37°C). 2. feverish excitement.



  • Fevering

    [fee-ver] /ˈfi vər/ noun 1. an abnormal condition of the body, characterized by undue rise in temperature, quickening of the pulse, and disturbance of various body functions. 2. an abnormally high body temperature. 3. the number of degrees of such a temperature above the normal. 4. any of a group of diseases in which high […]

  • Feverish

    [fee-ver-ish] /ˈfi vər ɪʃ/ adjective 1. having fever. 2. pertaining to, of the nature of, or resembling fever: a feverish excitement. 3. excited, restless, or uncontrolled, as if from fever. 4. having a tendency to produce fever. /ˈfiːvərɪʃ/ adjective 1. suffering from fever, esp a slight fever 2. in a state of restless excitement 3. […]



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