Fold



[fohld] /foʊld/

verb (used with object)
1.
to bend (cloth, paper, etc.) over upon itself.
2.
to bring into a compact form by bending and laying parts together (often followed by up):
to fold up a map; to fold one’s legs under oneself.
3.
to bring (the arms, hands, etc.) together in an intertwined or crossed manner; clasp; cross:
He folded his arms on his chest.
4.
to bend or wind (usually followed by about, round, etc.):
to fold one’s arms about a person’s neck.
5.
to bring (the wings) close to the body, as a bird on alighting.
6.
to enclose; wrap; envelop:
to fold something in paper.
7.
to embrace or clasp; :
to fold someone in one’s arms.
8.
Cards. to place (one’s cards) facedown so as to withdraw from the play.
9.
Informal. to bring to an end; close up:
The owner decided to fold the business and retire.
verb (used without object)
10.
to be folded or be capable of folding:
The doors fold back.
11.
Cards. to place one’s cards facedown so as to withdraw from the play.
12.
Informal. to fail in business; be forced to close:
The newspaper folded after 76 years.
13.
Informal. to yield or give in:
Dad folded and said we could go after all.
noun
14.
a part that is folded; pleat; layer:
folds of cloth.
15.
a crease made by folding:
He cut the paper along the fold.
16.
a hollow made by folding:
to carry something in the fold of one’s dress.
17.
a hollow place in undulating ground:
a fold of the mountains.
18.
Geology. a portion of strata that is folded or bent, as an anticline or syncline, or that connects two horizontal or parallel portions of strata of different levels (as a monocline).
19.
Journalism.

20.
a coil of a serpent, string, etc.
21.
the act of folding or doubling over.
22.
Anatomy. a margin or ridge formed by the folding of a membrane or other flat body part; plica.
Verb phrases
23.
fold in, Cookery. to mix in or add (an ingredient) by gently turning one part over another:
Fold in the egg whites.
24.
fold up, Informal.

[fohld] /foʊld/
noun
1.
an enclosure for sheep or, occasionally, other domestic animals.
2.
the sheep kept within it.
3.
a flock of sheep.
4.
a church.
5.
the members of a church; congregation:
He preached to the fold.
6.
a group sharing common beliefs, values, etc.:
He rejoined the fold after his youthful escapade.
verb (used with object)
7.
to confine (sheep or other domestic animals) in a fold.
1.
a native English suffix meaning “of so many parts,” or denoting multiplication by the number indicated by the stem or word to which the suffix is attached:
twofold; manifold.
/fəʊld/
verb
1.
to bend or be bent double so that one part covers another: to fold a sheet of paper
2.
(transitive) to bring together and intertwine (the arms, legs, etc): she folded her hands
3.
(transitive) (of birds, insects, etc) to close (the wings) together from an extended position
4.
(transitive; often foll by up or in) to enclose in or as if in a surrounding material
5.
(transitive) foll by in. to clasp (a person) in the arms
6.
(transitive) usually foll by round, about, etc. to wind (around); entwine
7.
(transitive) (poetic) to cover completely: night folded the earth
8.
(transitive) Also fold in. to mix (a whisked mixture) with other ingredients by gently turning one part over the other with a spoon
9.
to produce a bend (in stratified rock) or (of stratified rock) to display a bend
10.
(informal) (intransitive) often foll by up. to collapse; fail: the business folded
noun
11.
a piece or section that has been folded: a fold of cloth
12.
a mark, crease, or hollow made by folding
13.
a hollow in undulating terrain
14.
a bend in stratified rocks that results from movements within the earth’s crust and produces such structures as anticlines and synclines
15.
(anatomy) another word for plica (sense 1)
16.
a coil, as in a rope, etc
17.
an act of folding
/fəʊld/
noun
1.

2.
a church or the members of it
3.
any group or community sharing a way of life or holding the same values
verb
4.
(transitive) to gather or confine (sheep or other livestock) in a fold
suffix, suffix
1.
having so many parts, being so many times as much or as many, or multiplied by so much or so many: threefold, three-hundredfold
v.

Old English faldan (Mercian), fealdan (West Saxon), transitive, “to bend cloth back over itself,” class VII strong verb (past tense feold, past participle fealden), from Proto-Germanic *falthan, *faldan (cf. Middle Dutch vouden, Dutch vouwen, Old Norse falda, Middle Low German volden, Old High German faldan, German falten, Gothic falþan).

The Germanic words are from PIE *pel-to- (cf. Sanskrit putah “fold, pocket,” Albanian pale “fold,” Middle Irish alt “a joint,” Lithuanian pleta “I plait”), from root *pel- (3) “to fold” (cf. Greek ploos “fold,” Latin -plus).

The weak form developed from 15c. In late Old English also of the arms. Intransitive sense, “become folded” is from c.1300 (of the body or limbs); earlier “give way, fail” (mid-13c.). Sense of “to yield to pressure” is from late 14c. Related: Folded; folding.
n.

“pen or enclosure for sheep or other domestic animals,” Old English falæd, falud “stall, stable, cattle-pen,” a general Germanic word (cf. East Frisian folt “enclosure, dunghill,” Dutch vaalt “dunghill,” Danish fold “pen for sheep”), of uncertain origin. Figurative use by mid-14c.

“a bend or ply in anything,” mid-13c., from fold (v.).

multiplicative suffix, from Old English -feald, related to Old Norse -faldr; German -falt; Gothic falþs; Greek -paltos, -plos; Latin -plus, and to fold (v.). Crowded out in English by Latinate double, triple, etc., but still in manifold, hundredfold, etc.

fold 1 (fōld)
n.

fold
(fōld)

A bend in a layer of rock or in another planar feature such as foliation or the cleavage of a mineral. Folds occur as the result of deformation, usually associated with plate-tectonic forces.

verb

an enclosure for flocks to rest together (Isa. 13:20). Sheep-folds are mentioned Num. 32:16, 24, 36; 2 Sam. 7:8; Zeph. 2:6; John 10:1, etc. It was prophesied of the cities of Ammon (Ezek. 25:5), Aroer (Isa. 17:2), and Judaea, that they would be folds or couching-places for flocks. “Among the pots,” of the Authorized Version (Ps. 68:13), is rightly in the Revised Version, “among the sheepfolds.”

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