Found



[found] /faʊnd/

verb
1.
simple past tense and past participle of .
2.
equipped, outfitted, or furnished:
He bought a new boat, fully found.
adjective
3.
British. provided or furnished without additional charge, as to a tenant; included within the price, rent, etc. (often used postpositively):
Room to let, laundry found.
noun
4.
something that is provided or furnished without charge, especially meals given a domestic:
Maid wanted, good salary and found.
[found] /faʊnd/
verb (used with object)
1.
to set up or establish on a firm basis or for enduring existence:
to found a new publishing company.
2.
to lay the lowest part of (a structure) on a firm base or ground:
a house founded on solid rock.
3.
to base or ground (usually followed by on or upon):
a story founded on fact.
4.
to provide a basis or ground for.
[found] /faʊnd/
verb (used with object)
1.
to melt and pour (metal, glass, etc.) into a mold.
2.
to form or make (an article) of molten material in a mold; cast.
[fahynd] /faɪnd/
verb (used with object), found, finding.
1.
to come upon by chance; meet with:
He found a nickel in the street.
2.
to locate, attain, or obtain by search or effort:
to find an apartment; to find happiness.
3.
to locate or recover (something lost or misplaced):
I can’t find my blue socks.
4.
to discover or perceive after consideration:
to find something to be true.
5.
to gain or regain the use of:
His anger finally helped him find his tongue.
6.
to ascertain by study or calculation:
to find the sum of several numbers.
7.
to feel or perceive:
He finds it so.
8.
to become aware of, or discover (oneself), as being in a condition or location:
After a long illness, he found himself well again. She woke to find herself at home.
9.
to discover:
Columbus found America in 1492.
10.
Law.

11.
to provide or furnish:
Bring blankets and we’ll find the rest of the equipment for the trip.
12.
South Midland and Southern U.S. (of farm animals) to give birth to:
The brown cow found a calf yesterday.
verb (used without object), found, finding.
13.
to determine an issue after judicial inquiry:
The jury found for the plaintiff.
14.
British Hunting. to come upon game.
noun
15.
an act of finding or discovering.
16.
something found; a discovery, especially a valuable or gratifying one:
Our cook was a find.
17.
Hunting. a discovery of game, especially foxes.
Verb phrases
18.
find out,

Idioms
19.
find fault. (def 16).
20.
find oneself, to discover where one’s real interests or talents lie, and follow them:
After trying many occupations, he finally found himself and became an account executive.
/faʊnd/
verb
1.
the past tense and past participle of find
adjective
2.
furnished, or fitted out: the boat is well found
3.
(Brit) with meals, heating, bed linen, etc, provided without extra charge (esp in the phrase all found)
/faʊnd/
verb
1.
(transitive) to bring into being, set up, or establish (something, such as an institution, society, etc)
2.
(transitive) to build or establish the foundation or basis of
3.
(also intransitive; foll by on or upon) to have a basis (in); depend (on)
/faʊnd/
verb (transitive)
1.
to cast (a material, such as metal or glass) by melting and pouring into a mould
2.
to shape or make (articles) in this way; cast
/faɪnd/
verb (mainly transitive) finds, finding, found (faʊnd)
1.
to meet with or discover by chance
2.
to discover or obtain, esp by search or effort: to find happiness
3.
(may take a clause as object) to become aware of; realize: he found that nobody knew
4.
(may take a clause as object) to regard as being; consider: I find this wine a little sour
5.
to look for and point out (something to be criticized): to find fault
6.
(also intransitive) (law) to determine an issue after judicial inquiry and pronounce a verdict (upon): the court found the accused guilty
7.
to regain (something lost or not functioning): to find one’s tongue
8.
to reach (a target): the bullet found its mark
9.
to provide, esp with difficulty: we’ll find room for you too
10.
to be able to pay: I can’t find that amount of money
11.
find oneself, to realize and accept one’s real character; discover one’s true vocation
12.
find one’s feet, to become capable or confident, as in a new job
noun
13.
a person, thing, etc, that is found, esp a valuable or fortunate discovery
v.

“establish,” late 13c., from Old French founder (12c., Modern French fonder), from Latin fundare “to lay the bottom or foundation of something,” from fundus “bottom, foundation” (see fund (n.)). Related: Founded; founding. Phrase founding fathers with reference to the creators of the American republic is attested from 1916.

“cast metal,” late 14c., “to mix, mingle,” from Middle French fondre “pour out, melt, mix together,” from Old French fondre, from Latin fundere “melt, cast, pour out,” from PIE *gheud- (cf. Gothic giutan, German gießen, Old English geotan “to pour”), from root *gheu- “to pour” (cf. Greek khein “to pour,” khoane “funnel,” khymos “juice”). Meaning “to cast metal” is from 1560s.
adj.

“discovered,” late 14c., past participle adjective from find (v.). Expression and found in old advertisements for job openings, travelling berths, etc., attached to the wages or charges, indicates that meals are provided, from the expression to find one’s self “to provide for one’s self.” “When a laborer engages to provide himself with victuals, he is said to find himself, or to receive day wages” [Bartlett, “Dictionary of Americanisms,” 1848]. Hence, so much and found for “wages + meals provided.”
v.

Old English findan “come upon, meet with, discover; obtain by search or study” (class III strong verb; past tense fand, past participle funden), from Proto-Germanic *finthan “to come upon, discover” (cf. Old Saxon findan, Old Frisian finda, Old Norse finna, Middle Dutch vinden, Old High German findan, German finden, Gothic finþan), originally “to come upon.”

The Germanic word is from PIE root *pent- “to tread, go” (cf. Old High German fendeo “pedestrian;” Sanskrit panthah “path, way;” Avestan panta “way;” Greek pontos “open sea,” patein “to tread, walk;” Latin pons (genitive pontis) “bridge;” Old Church Slavonic poti “path,” peta “heel;” Russian put’ “path, way”). To find out “to discover by scrutiny” is from 1550s (Middle English had a verb, outfinden, c.1300).
n.

“person or thing discovered,” 1825, from find (v.).

noun

A remarkable discovery, esp of something unexpected (1872+)

Related Terms

if you can’t find ’em

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