Francis march



[mahrch for 1–3; mahrkh for 4] /mɑrtʃ for 1–3; mɑrx for 4/

noun
1.
Francis Andrew, 1825–1911, U.S. philologist and lexicographer.
2.
Fredric (Frederick McIntyre Bickel) 1897–1975, U.S. actor.
3.
Peyton Conway
[peyt-n kon-wey] /ˈpeɪt n ˈkɒn weɪ/ (Show IPA), 1864–1955, U.S. army officer (son of Francis Andrew March).
4.
German name of the .
/mɑːtʃ/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to walk or proceed with stately or regular steps, usually in a procession or military formation
2.
(transitive) to make (a person or group) proceed: he marched his army to the town
3.
(transitive) to traverse or cover by marching: to march a route
noun
4.
the act or an instance of marching
5.
a regular stride: a slow march
6.
a long or exhausting walk
7.
advance; progression (of time, etc)
8.
a distance or route covered by marching
9.
a piece of music, usually in four beats to the bar, having a strongly accented rhythm
10.
steal a march on, to gain an advantage over, esp by a secret or underhand enterprise
/mɑːtʃ/
noun
1.
Also called marchland. a frontier, border, or boundary or the land lying along it, often of disputed ownership
verb
2.
(intransitive; often foll by upon or with) to share a common border (with)
/mɑːtʃ/
noun
1.
the third month of the year, consisting of 31 days
/març/
noun
1.
the German name for the Morava (sense 1)
abbreviation
1.
Master of Architecture
v.

“to walk with regular tread,” early 15c., from Middle French marcher “to march, walk,” from Old French marchier “to stride, march,” originally “to trample, tread underfoot,” perhaps from Frankish *markon or some other Germanic source related to obsolete Middle English march (n.) “borderland” (see march (n.2)). Or possibly from Gallo-Roman *marcare, from Latin marcus “hammer,” via notion of “tramping the feet.” Meaning “to cause to march” is from 1590s. Related: Marched; marching. Marching band is attested from 1852. Italian marciare, Spanish marchar are said to be from French.
n.

“act of marching,” 1580s, from march (v.) or else from Middle French marche (n.), from marcher (v.). The musical sense first attested 1570s, from notion of “rhythmic drumbeat” for marching. Transferred sense of “forward motion” is from 1620s.

“boundary,” late 13c. (in reference to the borderlands beside Wales, rendering Old English Mercia), from Old French marche “boundary, frontier,” from Frankish *marka or some other Germanic source (cf. Old High German marchon “to mark out, delimit,” German Mark “boundary;” see mark (n.1)). Now obsolete. There was a verb in Middle English (c.1300), “tohave a common boundary,” from Old French marchier “border upon, lie alongside.”

third month, c.1200, from Anglo-French marche, Old French marz, from Latin Martius (mensis) “(month) of Mars,” from Mars (genitive Martis). Replaced Old English hreðmonaþ, the first part of which is of uncertain meaning, perhaps from hræd “quick, nimble, ready, active, alert, prompt.” For March hare, proverbial type of madness, see mad.
In addition to the idiom beginning with march

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