Freak



[freek] /frik/

noun
1.
any abnormal phenomenon or product or unusual object; anomaly; aberration.
2.
a person or animal on exhibition as an example of a strange deviation from nature; monster.
3.
a sudden and apparently causeless change or turn of events, the mind, etc.; an apparently capricious notion, occurrence, etc.:
That kind of sudden storm is a freak.
4.
Numismatics. an imperfect coin, undetected at the mint and put into circulation.
5.
Philately. a stamp differing from others of the same printing because of creases, dirty engraving plates, etc.
Compare (def 8), (def 8).
6.
Slang.

7.
Archaic. capriciousness; whimsicality.
adjective
8.
unusual; odd; irregular:
a freak epidemic.
verb (used with or without object)
9.
to become or make frightened, nervous, or wildly excited:
The loud noise caused the horse to freak.
Verb phrases
10.
freak out, Slang.

[freek] /frik/
verb (used with object)
1.
to fleck, streak, or variegate:
great splashes of color freaking the sky.
noun
2.
a fleck or streak of color.
/friːk/
noun
1.
a person, animal, or plant that is abnormal or deformed; monstrosity
2.

3.
a personal whim or caprice
4.
(informal) a person who acts or dresses in a markedly unconventional or strange way
5.
(informal) a person who is obsessed with something specified: a jazz freak
verb
6.
See freak out
/friːk/
noun
1.
a fleck or streak of colour
verb
2.
(transitive) to streak with colour; variegate
n.

1560s, “sudden turn of mind,” of unknown origin, perhaps related to Old English frician “to dance” (not recorded in Middle English, but the word may have survived in dialect) [OED, Barnhart], or perhaps from Middle English frek “bold, quickly,” from Old English frec “greedy, gluttonous” (cf. German frech “bold, impudent”).

Sense of “capricious notion” (1560s) and “unusual thing, fancy” (1784) preceded that of “strange or abnormal individual” (first in freak of nature, 1847; cf. Latin lusus naturæ, used in English from 1660s). The sense in health freak, ecology freak, etc. is attested from 1908 (originally Kodak freak, a camera buff). Freak show attested from 1887.
v.

“change, distort,” 1911, from freak (n.). Earlier, “to streak or fleck randomly” (1630s). Related: Freaked; freaking.

noun

verb

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Freak-ass

    adjective Strange; freakish: Some freak-ass accident (1990s+)

  • Freakazoid

    noun, adjective a bizarre or very strange person; a person with outstanding or unusual skills but questionable sanity Word Origin 1984; patterned after schizoid



  • Freaker

    [freek] /frik/ noun 1. any abnormal phenomenon or product or unusual object; anomaly; aberration. 2. a person or animal on exhibition as an example of a strange deviation from nature; monster. 3. a sudden and apparently causeless change or turn of events, the mind, etc.; an apparently capricious notion, occurrence, etc.: That kind of sudden […]

  • Freakiness

    [free-kee] /ˈfri ki/ adjective, freakier, freakiest. 1. . 2. Slang. /ˈfriːkɪ/ adjective freakier, freakiest 1. (slang) strange; unconventional; bizarre 2. another word for freakish adj. 1824, from freak (n.) + -y (2). Psychedelic sense is from 1966. adjective Having the qualities of a freak or a freak-out; far out: I think it would be freaky […]



Disclaimer: Freak definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.