Frisk



[frisk] /frɪsk/

verb (used without object)
1.
to dance, leap, skip, or gambol; frolic:
The dogs and children frisked about on the lawn.
verb (used with object)
2.
to search (a person) for concealed weapons, contraband goods, etc., by feeling the person’s clothing:
The police frisked both of the suspects.
noun
3.
a leap, skip, or caper.
4.
a frolic or gambol.
5.
the act of frisking a person.
/frɪsk/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to leap, move about, or act in a playful manner; frolic
2.
(transitive) (esp of animals) to whisk or wave briskly: the dog frisked its tail
3.
(transitive)

noun
4.
a playful antic or movement; frolic
5.
the act or an instance of frisking a person
v.

1510s, “to dance, frolic,” from Middle English frisk “lively” (mid-15c.), from Middle French frisque “lively, brisk,” from Old French frisque “fresh, new; merry, animated” (13c.), possibly from a Germanic source (cf. Middle Dutch vrisch “fresh,” Old High German frisc “lively;” see fresh (adj.1)). Sense of “pat down in a search” first recorded 1781. Related: Frisked; frisking. As a noun from 1520s.

noun

: They did a quick frisk and let him go

verb

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