Fuller



[foo l-er] /ˈfʊl ər/

noun
1.
a person who cloth.
[foo l-er] /ˈfʊl ər/
noun
1.
a half-round hammer used for grooving and spreading iron.
2.
a tool or part of a die for reducing the sectional area of a piece of work.
3.
a groove running along the flat of a sword blade.
verb (used with object)
4.
to reduce the sectional area of (a piece of metal) with a fuller or fullers.
[foo l-er] /ˈfʊl ər/
noun
1.
George, 1822–84, U.S. painter.
2.
Henry B(lake) (“Stanton Page”) 1857–1929, U.S. novelist, poet, and critic.
3.
Melville Weston
[wes-tuh n] /ˈwɛs tən/ (Show IPA), 1833–1910, chief justice of the U.S. 1888–1910.
4.
R(ichard) Buckminster, 1895–1983, U.S. engineer, designer, and architect.
5.
(Sarah) Margaret (Marchioness Ossoli) 1810–50, U.S. author and literary critic.
6.
Thomas, 1608–61, English clergyman and historian.
[foo l] /fʊl/
adjective, fuller, fullest.
1.
completely filled; containing all that can be held; filled to utmost capacity:
a full cup.
2.
complete; entire; maximum:
a full supply of food for a three-day hike.
3.
of the maximum size, amount, extent, volume, etc.:
a full load of five tons; to receive full pay.
4.
(of garments, drapery, etc.) wide, ample, or having ample folds.
5.
abundant; well-supplied:
a yard full of litter; a cabinet full of medicine.
6.
filled or rounded out, as in form:
a full bust.
7.
engrossed; occupied (usually followed by of):
She was full of her own anxieties.
8.
of the same parents:
full brothers.
9.
Music. ample and complete in volume or richness of sound.
10.
(of wines) having considerable body.
11.
Baseball.

12.
being slightly oversized, as a sheet of glass cut too large to fit into a frame.
13.
Poker. of or relating to the three cards of the same denomination in a full house:
He won the hand with a pair of kings and sixes full.
adverb
14.
exactly or directly:
The blow struck him full in the face.
15.
very:
You know full well what I mean.
16.
, completely, or entirely; quite; at least:
The blow knocked him full around. It happened full 30 years ago.
verb (used with object)
17.
Sewing.

verb (used without object)
18.
(of the moon) to become full.
noun
19.
the highest or fullest state, condition, or degree:
The moon is at the full.
Idioms
20.
in full,

21.
to the full, to the greatest extent; thoroughly:
They enjoyed themselves to the full.
/ˈfʊlə/
noun
1.
a person who fulls cloth for his living
/ˈfʊlə/
noun
1.
Also called fullering tool. a tool for forging a groove
2.
a tool for caulking a riveted joint
verb
3.
(transitive) to forge (a groove) or caulk (a riveted joint) with a fuller
/ˈfʊlə/
noun
1.
(Richard) Buckminster. 1895–1983, US architect and engineer: developed the geodesic dome
2.
Roy (Broadbent). 1912–91, British poet and writer, whose collections include The Middle of a War (1942) and A Lost Season (1944), both of which are concerned with World War II, Epitaphs and Occasions (1949), and Available for Dreams (1989)
3.
Thomas. 1608–61, English clergyman and antiquarian; author of The Worthies of England (1662)
/fʊl/
adjective
1.
holding or containing as much as possible; filled to capacity or near capacity
2.
abundant in supply, quantity, number, etc: full of energy
3.
having consumed enough food or drink
4.
(esp of the face or figure) rounded or plump; not thin
5.
(prenominal) with no part lacking; complete: a full dozen
6.
(prenominal) with all privileges, rights, etc; not restricted: a full member
7.
(prenominal) of, relating to, or designating a relationship established by descent from the same parents: full brother
8.
filled with emotion or sentiment: a full heart
9.
(postpositive) foll by of. occupied or engrossed (with): full of his own projects
10.
(music)

11.
(of a garment, esp a skirt) containing a large amount of fabric; of ample cut
12.
(of sails, etc) distended by wind
13.
(of wine, such as a burgundy) having a heavy body
14.
(of a colour) containing a large quantity of pure hue as opposed to white or grey; rich; saturated
15.
(informal) drunk
16.
(nautical) full and by, another term for close-hauled
17.
full of oneself, full of pride or conceit; egoistic
18.
full up, filled to capacity: the cinema was full up
19.
in full cry, (esp of a pack of hounds) in hot pursuit of quarry
20.
in full swing, at the height of activity: the party was in full swing
adverb
21.

22.
exactly; directly; right: he hit him full in the stomach
23.
very; extremely (esp in the phrase full well)
24.
full out, with maximum effort or speed
noun
25.
the greatest degree, extent, etc
26.
(Brit) a ridge of sand or shingle along a seashore
27.
in full, without omitting, decreasing, or shortening: we paid in full for our mistake
28.
to the full, to the greatest extent; thoroughly; fully
verb
29.
(transitive) (needlework) to gather or tuck
30.
(intransitive) (of the moon) to be fully illuminated
/fʊl/
verb
1.
(of cloth, yarn, etc) to become or to make (cloth, yarn, etc) heavier and more compact during manufacture through shrinking and beating or pressing
n.

“one who fulls cloth,” Old English fullere, from Latin fullo “fuller” (see foil (v.)). The substance called fuller’s earth (silicate of alumina) is first recorded 1520s, so called because it was used in cleansing cloth.
adj.

Old English full “completely, full, perfect, entire, utter,” from Proto-Germanic *fullaz (cf. Old Saxon full, Old Frisian ful, Old Norse fullr, Old High German fol, German voll, Gothic fulls), from PIE *pele- (1) “to fill” (see poly-).

Adverbial sense was common in Middle English (full well, full many, etc.). Related: Fuller; fullest. Full moon was Old English fulles monan; first record of full-blood in relation to racial purity is from 1812. Full house is 1710 in the theatrical sense, 1887 in the poker sense.
v.

“to tread or beat cloth to cleanse or thicken it,” late 14c., from Old French fouler, from Latin fullo (see foil (v.)); Old English had the agent-noun fullere, probably directly from Latin fullo.

adjective

Drunk (1872+)

The word “full” is from the Anglo-Saxon fullian, meaning “to whiten.” To full is to press or scour cloth in a mill. This art is one of great antiquity. Mention is made of “fuller’s soap” (Mal. 3:2), and of “the fuller’s field” (2 Kings 18:17). At his transfiguration our Lord’s rainment is said to have been white “so as no fuller on earth could white them” (Mark 9:3). En-rogel (q.v.), meaning literally “foot-fountain,” has been interpreted as the “fuller’s fountain,” because there the fullers trod the cloth with their feet.

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    [foo l-uh-reen] /ˈfʊl əˌrin/ noun 1. any of a class of molecules of carbon having a roughly spherical shape. /ˈfʊləˌriːn/ noun 1. any of various carbon molecules with a polyhedral structure similar to that of buckminsterfullerene, such as C70, C76, and C84 See also buckminsterfullerene fullerene (fl’ə-rēn’) Any of various carbon molecules that are nearly […]

  • Fulleride

    /ˈfʊləˌraɪd/ noun 1. a compound of a fullerene in which atoms are trapped inside the cage of carbon atoms



  • Fullering

    [foo l-er] /ˈfʊl ər/ noun 1. a half-round hammer used for grooving and spreading iron. 2. a tool or part of a die for reducing the sectional area of a piece of work. 3. a groove running along the flat of a sword blade. verb (used with object) 4. to reduce the sectional area of […]

  • Fullerite

    /ˈfʊləˌraɪt/ noun 1. a crystalline form of a fullerene



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