Gapping



[gap-ing] /ˈgæp ɪŋ/

noun, Linguistics.
1.
a rule of transformational grammar by which repeated instances of a verb are deleted from conjoined sentences, as in the deletion of brought from Mary brought the bread, John the cheese, and Bill the wine.
[gap] /gæp/
noun
1.
a break or opening, as in a fence, wall, or military line; breach:
We found a gap in the enemy’s line of fortifications.
2.
an empty space or interval; interruption in continuity; hiatus:
a momentary gap in a siren’s wailing; a gap in his memory.
3.
a wide divergence or difference; disparity:
the gap between expenses and income; the gap between ideals and actions.
4.
a difference or disparity in attitudes, perceptions, character, or development, or a lack of confidence or understanding, perceived as creating a problem:
the technology gap; a communications gap.
5.
a deep, sloping ravine or cleft through a mountain ridge.
6.
Chiefly Midland and Southern U.S. a mountain pass:
the Cumberland Gap.
7.
Aeronautics. the distance between one supporting surface of an airplane and another above or below it.
verb (used with object), gapped, gapping.
8.
to make a gap, opening, or breach in.
verb (used without object), gapped, gapping.
9.
to come open or apart; form or show a gap.
/ˈɡæpɪŋ/
noun
1.
(in transformational grammar) a rule that deletes repetitions of a verb, as in the sentence Bill voted for Smith, Sam for McKay, and Dave for Harris
2.
the act or practice of taking a gap year
/ɡæp/
noun
1.
a break or opening in a wall, fence, etc
2.
a break in continuity; interruption; hiatus: there is a serious gap in the accounts
3.
a break in a line of hills or mountains affording a route through
4.
(mainly US) a gorge or ravine
5.
a divergence or difference; disparity: there is a gap between his version of the event and hers, the generation gap
6.
(electronics)

7.
bridge a gap, close a gap, fill a gap, stop a gap, to remedy a deficiency
verb gaps, gapping, gapped
8.
(transitive) to make a breach or opening in
n.

early 14c. (mid-13c. in place names), from Old Norse gap “chasm,” related to gapa “to gape,” from PIE *ghai- “to yawn, gape” (see yawn (v.)). Originally “hole in a wall or hedge;” broader sense is 16c. In U.S., common in place names in reference to a break or pass in a long mountain chain (especially one that water flows through). As a verb from 1847.

gap (gāp)
n.

Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry

a rent or opening in a wall (Ezek. 13:5; comp. Amos 4:3). The false prophets did not stand in the gap (Ezek. 22: 30), i.e., they did nothing to stop the outbreak of wickedness.

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