Gating



[gey-ting] /ˈgeɪ tɪŋ/

noun, Cell Biology.
1.
the process by which a channel in a cell membrane opens or closes.
[geyt] /geɪt/
noun
1.
a movable barrier, usually on hinges, closing an opening in a fence, wall, or other enclosure.
2.
an opening permitting passage through an enclosure.
3.
a tower, architectural setting, etc., for defending or adorning such an opening or for providing a monumental entrance to a street, park, etc.:
the gates of the walled city; the palace gate.
4.
any means of access or entrance:
The gate to stardom is talent.
5.
a mountain pass.
6.
any movable barrier, as at a tollbooth or a road or railroad crossing.
7.
a gateway or passageway in a passenger terminal or pier that leads to a place for boarding a train, plane, or ship.
8.
a sliding barrier for regulating the passage of water, steam, or the like, as in a dam or pipe; valve.
9.
Skiing.

10.
the total number of persons who pay for admission to an athletic contest, a performance, an exhibition, etc.
11.
the total receipts from such admissions.
12.
Cell Biology. a temporary channel in a cell membrane through which substances diffuse into or out of a cell.
13.
Movies. .
14.
a sash or frame for a saw or gang of saws.
15.
Metallurgy.

16.
Electronics.

verb (used with object), gated, gating.
17.
(at British universities) to punish by confining to the college grounds.
18.
Electronics.

verb (used without object), gated, gating.
19.
Metallurgy. to make or use a gate.
Idioms
20.
get the gate, Slang. to be dismissed, sent away, or rejected.
21.
give (someone) the gate, Slang.

/ɡeɪt/
noun
1.
a movable barrier, usually hinged, for closing an opening in a wall, fence, etc
2.
an opening to allow passage into or out of an enclosed place
3.
any means of entrance or access
4.
a mountain pass or gap, esp one providing entry into another country or region
5.

6.
(in a large airport) any of the numbered exits leading to the airfield or aircraft: passengers for Paris should proceed to gate 14
7.
(horse racing) short for starting gate
8.
(electronics)

9.
the electrode region or regions in a field-effect transistor that is biased to control the conductivity of the channel between the source and drain
10.
a component in a motion-picture camera or projector that holds each frame flat and momentarily stationary behind the lens
11.
a slotted metal frame that controls the positions of the gear lever in a motor vehicle
12.
(rowing) a hinged clasp to prevent the oar from jumping out of a rowlock
13.
a frame surrounding the blade or blades of a saw
verb (transitive)
14.
to provide with a gate or gates
15.
(Brit) to restrict (a student) to the school or college grounds as a punishment
16.
to select (part of a waveform) in terms of amplitude or time
/ɡeɪt/
noun (dialect)
1.
the channels by which molten metal is poured into a mould
2.
the metal that solidifies in such channels
/ɡeɪt/
noun (Scot & Northern English, dialect)
1.
a way, road, street, or path
2.
a way or method of doing something
n.

“opening, entrance,” Old English geat (plural geatu) “gate, door, opening, passage, hinged framework barrier,” from Proto-Germanic *gatan (cf. Old Norse gat “opening, passage,” Old Saxon gat “eye of a needle, hole,” Old Frisian gat “hole, opening,” Dutch gat “gap, hole, breach,” German Gasse “street”), of unknown origin. Meaning “money collected from selling tickets” dates from 1896 (short for gate money, 1820). Gate-crasher is from 1927. Finnish katu, Lettish gatua “street” are Germanic loan-words.
v.

“provide with a gate,” 1906, from gate (n.). Originally of moulds. Related: Gated (1620s). Gated community recorded by 1989 (earliest reference to Emerald Bay, Laguna Beach, Calif.

noun

verb

GIVE someone THE GATE (1940s+)

Related Terms

crash, get one’s tail in a gate

[musicians’ senses fr the simile swing like a gate, ”play or respond to swing music well and readily,” with some influence of ‘gator and alligator; or perhaps fr gatemouth, a nickname for Louis Armstrong; first musical sense said to have been coined by Louis Armstrong]

(1.) Of cities, as of Jerusalem (Jer. 37:13; Neh. 1:3; 2:3; 3:3), of Sodom (Gen. 19:1), of Gaza (Judg. 16:3). (2.) Of royal palaces (Neh. 2:8). (3.) Of the temple of Solomon (1 Kings 6:34, 35; 2 Kings 18:16); of the holy place (1 Kings 6:31, 32; Ezek. 41:23, 24); of the outer courts of the temple, the beautiful gate (Acts 3:2). (4.) Tombs (Matt. 27:60). (5.) Prisons (Acts 12:10; 16:27). (6.) Caverns (1 Kings 19:13). (7.) Camps (Ex. 32:26, 27; Heb. 13:12). The materials of which gates were made were, (1.) Iron and brass (Ps. 107:16; Isa. 45:2; Acts 12:10). (2.) Stones and pearls (Isa. 54:12; Rev. 21:21). (3.) Wood (Judg. 16:3) probably. At the gates of cities courts of justice were frequently held, and hence “judges of the gate” are spoken of (Deut. 16:18; 17:8; 21:19; 25:6, 7, etc.). At the gates prophets also frequently delivered their messages (Prov. 1:21; 8:3; Isa. 29:21; Jer. 17:19, 20; 26:10). Criminals were punished without the gates (1 Kings 21:13; Acts 7:59). By the “gates of righteousness” we are probably to understand those of the temple (Ps. 118:19). “The gates of hell” (R.V., “gates of Hades”) Matt. 16:18, are generally interpreted as meaning the power of Satan, but probably they may mean the power of death, denoting that the Church of Christ shall never die.

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