[juh-net-iks] /dʒəˈnɛt ɪks/

noun, (used with a singular verb)
Biology. the science of heredity, dealing with resemblances and differences of related organisms resulting from the interaction of their genes and the environment.
the properties and phenomena of an organism.
(functioning as sing) the branch of biology concerned with the study of heredity and variation in organisms
the genetic features and constitution of a single organism, species, or group

1872, “laws of origination;” see genetic + -ics. A coinage of English biologist William Bateson (1861-1926). Meaning “study of heredity” is from 1891.

genetics ge·net·ics (jə-nět’ĭks)
The branch of biology that deals with heredity, especially the mechanisms of hereditary transmission and the variation of inherited traits among similar or related organisms.
The scientific study of the principles of heredity and the variation of inherited traits among related organisms.

The study of heredity, or how the characteristics of living things are transmitted from one generation to the next. Every living thing contains the genetic material that makes up DNA molecules. This material is passed on when organisms reproduce. The basic unit of heredity is the gene. (See chromosomes; dominant trait; genetic code; Gregor Mendel; recessive trait; and sexual reproduction.)


Read Also:

  • Genetic-screening

    noun 1. assessment of an individual’s genetic makeup to detect inheritable defects that may be transmitted to offspring. 2. evaluation of a person’s genetic makeup in an attempt to predict genetic predisposition to certain illnesses associated with a workplace environment.

  • Genetotrophic

    genetotrophic ge·net·o·troph·ic (jə-nět’ō-trŏf’ĭk, -trō’fĭk) adj.

  • Gene-tox

    Genetic Toxicology

  • Gene-transfer

    noun 1. Biotechnology. the insertion of copies of a gene into living cells in order to induce synthesis of the gene’s product: the desired gene may be microinjected directly into the cell or it may be inserted into the core of a virus by gene splicing and the virus allowed to infect the cell for […]

Disclaimer: Genetics definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.