[gawrd, gohrd, goo rd] /gɔrd, goʊrd, gʊərd/

the hard-shelled fruit of any of various plants, especially those of Lagenaria siceraria (white-flowered gourd or bottle gourd) whose dried shell is used for bowls and other utensils, and Cucurbita pepo (yellow-flowered gourd) used ornamentally.
Compare .
a plant bearing such a fruit.
a dried and excavated gourd shell used as a bottle, dipper, flask, etc.
a gourd-shaped, small-necked bottle or flask.
out of / off one’s gourd, Slang. out of one’s mind; crazy.
the fruit of any of various cucurbitaceous or similar plants, esp the bottle gourd and some squashes, whose dried shells are used for ornament, drinking cups, etc
any plant that bears this fruit See also sour gourd, dishcloth gourd, calabash
a bottle or flask made from the dried shell of the bottle gourd
a small bottle shaped like a gourd

c.1300, from Anglo-French gourde, from Old French coorde, ultimately from Latin cucurbita “gourd,” of uncertain origin, perhaps related to cucumis “cucumber.”


The head; skull (1844+)

Related Terms

lose one’s gourd, out of one’s head

(1.) Jonah’s gourd (Jonah 4:6-10), bearing the Hebrew name _kikayon_ (found only here), was probably the kiki of the Egyptians, the croton. This is the castor-oil plant, a species of ricinus, the palma Christi, so called from the palmate division of its leaves. Others with more probability regard it as the cucurbita the el-keroa of the Arabs, a kind of pumpkin peculiar to the East. “It is grown in great abundance on the alluvial banks of the Tigris and on the plain between the river and the ruins of Nineveh.” At the present day it is trained to run over structures of mud and brush to form boots to protect the gardeners from the heat of the noon-day sun. It grows with extraordinary rapidity, and when cut or injured withers away also with great rapidity. (2.) Wild gourds (2 Kings 4:38-40), Heb. pakkuoth, belong to the family of the cucumber-like plants, some of which are poisonous. The species here referred to is probably the colocynth (Cucumis colocynthus). The LXX. render the word by “wild pumpkin.” It abounds in the desert parts of Syria, Egypt, and Arabia. There is, however, another species, called the Cucumis prophetarum, from the idea that it afforded the gourd which “the sons of the prophets” shred by mistake into their pottage.


Read Also:

  • Gourd-cup

    noun 1. a metal cup of the 16th and 17th centuries having a gourd-shaped bowl mounted on a stem.

  • Gourde

    [French goord; English goo rd] /French gurd; English gʊərd/ noun, plural gourdes [French goord; English goo rdz] /French gurd; English gʊərdz/ (Show IPA) 1. a paper money and monetary unit of Haiti, equal to 100 centimes. Abbreviation: G., Gde. /ɡʊəd/ noun 1. the standard monetary unit of Haiti, divided into 100 centimes

  • Gourd-family

    noun 1. the plant family Cucurbitaceae, characterized by tendril-bearing vines, either trailing or climbing and having alternate, palmately lobed leaves, often large yellow or greenish flowers, and many-seeded, fleshy fruit with a hard rind, and including the cucumber, gourd, melon, pumpkin, and squash.

  • Gourmand

    [goo r-mahnd, goo r-muh nd] /gʊərˈmɑnd, ˈgʊər mənd/ noun 1. a person who is fond of good eating, often indiscriminatingly and to excess. 2. a gourmet; epicure. /ˈɡʊəmənd; French ɡurmɑ̃/ noun 1. a person devoted to eating and drinking, esp to excess n. late 15c., “glutton,” from Middle French gourmant “glutton,” originally an adj., “gluttonous,” […]

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