[ber-ee] /ˈbɛr i/

verb (used with object), buried, burying.
to put in the ground and cover with earth:
The pirates buried the chest on the island.
to put (a corpse) in the ground or a vault, or into the sea, often with ceremony:
They buried the sailor with full military honors.
to plunge in deeply; cause to sink in:
to bury an arrow in a target.
to cover in order to conceal from sight:
She buried the card in the deck.
to immerse (oneself):
He buried himself in his work.
to put out of one’s mind:
to bury an insult.
to consign to obscurity; cause to appear insignificant by assigning to an unimportant location, position, etc.:
Her name was buried in small print at the end of the book.
noun, plural buries.
Nautical. 1 (def 8a, b).
bury one’s head in the sand, to avoid reality; ignore the facts of a situation:
You cannot continue to bury your head in the sand—you must learn to face facts.
bury the hatchet, to become reconciled or reunited.
partially buried: a ring half-buried in the mud
verb (transitive) buries, burying, buried
to place (a corpse) in a grave, usually with funeral rites; inter
to place in the earth and cover with soil
to lose through death
to cover from sight; hide
to embed; sink: to bury a nail in plaster
to occupy (oneself) with deep concentration; engross: to be buried in a book
to dismiss from the mind; abandon: to bury old hatreds
bury the hatchet, to cease hostilities and become reconciled
bury one’s head in the sand, to refuse to face a problem
a town in NW England, in Bury unitary authority, Greater Manchester: an early textile centre. Pop: 60 178 (2001)
a unitary authority in NW England, in Greater Manchester. Pop: 181 900 (2003 est). Area: 99 sq km (38 sq miles)

Old English byrgan “to raise a mound, hide, bury, inter,” akin to beorgan “to shelter,” from Proto-Germanic *burzjan- “protection, shelter” (cf. Old Saxon bergan, Dutch bergen, Old Norse bjarga, Swedish berga, Old High German bergan “protect, shelter, conceal,” German bergen, Gothic bairgan “to save, preserve”), from PIE root *bhergh- “protect, preserve” (cf. Old Church Slavonic brego “I preserve, guard”). Related: Buried; burying. Burying-ground “cemetery” attested from 1711.

The Old English -y- was a short “oo” sound, like modern French -u-. Under normal circumstances it transformed into Modern English -i- (e.g. bridge, kiss, listen, sister), but in bury and a few other words (e.g. merry, knell) it retained a Kentish change to “e” that took place in the late Old English period. In the West Midlands, meanwhile, the Old English -y- sound persisted, slightly modified over time, giving the standard modern pronunciation of blush, much, church.



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