Hauled



[hawl] /hɔl/

verb (used with object)
1.
to pull or draw with force; move by drawing; drag:
They hauled the boat up onto the beach.
2.
to cart or transport; carry:
He hauled freight.
3.
to cause to descend; lower (often followed by down):
to haul down the flag.
4.
to arrest or bring before a magistrate or other authority (often followed by before, in, to, into, etc.):
He was hauled before the judge.
verb (used without object)
5.
to pull or tug.
6.
to go or come to a place, especially with effort:
After roistering about the streets, they finally hauled into the tavern.
7.
to do carting or transport, or move freight commercially.
8.
Nautical.

noun
9.
an act or instance of hauling; a strong pull or tug.
10.
something that is hauled.
11.
the load hauled at one time; quantity carried or transported.
12.
the distance or route over which anything is hauled.
13.
Fishing.

14.
the act of taking or acquiring something.
15.
something that is taken or acquired:
The thieves’ haul included several valuable paintings.
Verb phrases
16.
haul off,

17.
haul up,

Idioms
18.
haul around, Nautical.

19.
haul in with, Nautical. to approach.
20.
haul / shag ass, Slang: Vulgar. to get a move on; hurry.
21.
long haul,

22.
short haul,

/hɔːl/
verb
1.
to drag or draw (something) with effort
2.
(transitive) to transport, as in a lorry
3.
(nautical) to alter the course of (a vessel), esp so as to sail closer to the wind
4.
(transitive) (nautical) to draw or hoist (a vessel) out of the water onto land or a dock for repair, storage, etc
5.
(intransitive) (nautical) (of the wind) to blow from a direction nearer the bow Compare veer1 (sense 3b)
6.
(intransitive) to change one’s opinion or action
noun
7.
the act of dragging with effort
8.
(esp of fish) the amount caught at a single time
9.
something that is hauled
10.
the goods obtained from a robbery
11.
a distance of hauling: a three-mile haul
12.
the amount of a contraband seizure: arms haul, drugs haul
13.
in the long haul, over the long haul

v.

1580s, hall, variant spelling of Middle English halen (see hale (v.)), representing a change in pronunciation after c.1200. Spelling with -au- or -aw- is from early 17c. Related: Hauled; hauling. To haul off “pull back a little” before striking or otherwise acting is American English, 1802.
n.

1660s, “act of hauling,” from haul (v.). Meaning “something gained” is from 1776, perhaps on notion of “drawing” a profit, or of the catch from hauling fishing nets. Meaning “distance over which something must be hauled” (usually with long or short) is attested from 1873.

noun

Related Terms

cold haul, for the long haul, get one’s ashes hauled, long haul, over the long haul

[1776+; fr the contents of a fish net that is hauled]

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Hauler

    [haw-ler] /ˈhɔ lər/ noun 1. a person who . 2. a commercial trucking company. 3. a vehicle used for or trucking. 4. Slang. a car capable of very high speeds. n. 1670s, from haul (v.) + -er (1). noun A very fast car; hot rod (1950s+ Hot rodders)

  • Haulier

    [hawl-yer] /ˈhɔl yər/ noun, British Dialect. 1. . /ˈhɔːljə/ noun 1. a person or firm that transports goods by lorry; one engaged in road haulage 2. a person that hauls, esp a mine worker who conveys coal from the workings to the foot of the shaft



  • Haul it

    verb phrase To run away; flee; escape [1940s+ Black; fr haul ass]

  • Haulm

    [hawm] /hɔm/ noun 1. stems or stalks collectively, as of grain or of peas, beans, or hops, especially as used for litter or thatching. 2. a single stem or stalk. /hɔːm/ noun 1. the stems or stalks of beans, peas, potatoes, grasses, etc, collectively, as used for thatching, bedding, etc 2. a single stem of […]



Disclaimer: Hauled definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.