Hiding



[hahy-ding] /ˈhaɪ dɪŋ/

noun
1.
act of concealing; concealment:
to remain in hiding.
2.
a secret refuge or means of concealment.
[hahy-ding] /ˈhaɪ dɪŋ/
noun, Informal.
1.
a severe beating; flogging; thrashing.
[hahyd] /haɪd/
verb (used with object), hid, hidden or hid, hiding.
1.
to conceal from sight; prevent from being seen or discovered:
Where did she hide her jewels?
2.
to obstruct the view of; cover up:
The sun was hidden by the clouds.
3.
to conceal from knowledge or exposure; keep secret:
to hide one’s feelings.
verb (used without object), hid, hidden or hid, hiding.
4.
to conceal oneself; lie concealed:
He hid in the closet.
noun
5.
British. a place of concealment for hunting or observing wildlife; hunting blind.
Verb phrases
6.
hide out, to go into or remain in hiding:
After breaking out of jail, he hid out in a deserted farmhouse.
[hahyd] /haɪd/
noun
1.
the pelt or skin of one of the larger animals (cow, horse, buffalo, etc.), raw or dressed.
2.
Informal.

3.
Australia and New Zealand Informal. impertinence; impudence.
verb (used with object), hided, hiding.
4.
Informal. to administer a beating to; thrash.
5.
to protect (a rope, as a boltrope of a sail) with a covering of leather.
Idioms
6.
hide nor hair, a trace or evidence, as of something missing:
They didn’t find hide nor hair of the murder weapon.
Also, hide or hair.
/ˈhaɪdɪŋ/
noun
1.
the state of concealment (esp in the phrase in hiding)
2.
hiding place, a place of concealment
/ˈhaɪdɪŋ/
noun
1.
(informal) a flogging; beating
2.
be on a hiding to nothing, to be bound to fail; to face impossible odds
/haɪd/
verb hides, hiding, hid (hɪd), hidden (ˈhɪdən), hid
1.
to put or keep (oneself or an object) in a secret place; conceal (oneself or an object) from view or discovery: to hide a pencil, to hide from the police
2.
(transitive) to conceal or obscure: the clouds hid the sun
3.
(transitive) to keep secret
4.
(transitive) to turn (one’s head, eyes, etc) away
noun
5.
(Brit) a place of concealment, usually disguised to appear as part of the natural environment, used by hunters, birdwatchers, etc US and Canadian equivalent blind
/haɪd/
noun
1.
the skin of an animal, esp the tough thick skin of a large mammal, either tanned or raw
2.
(informal) the human skin
3.
(Austral & NZ, informal) impudence
verb hides, hiding, hided
4.
(transitive) (informal) to flog
/haɪd/
noun
1.
an obsolete Brit unit of land measure, varying in magnitude from about 60 to 120 acres
n.

“concealment,” early 13c., verbal noun from hide (v.1). Hiding place is from mid-15c.; an Old English word for this was hydels.

“a flogging,” 1809, from hide (n.1), perhaps in reference to a whip or thong made of animal hide. Old English had hyde ðolian “to undergo a flogging,” and hydgild “fine paid to save one’s skin (from a punishment by flogging).” The English expression a hiding to nothing (by 1905) referred to a situation where there was disgrace in defeat and no honor in victory.
v.

Old English hydan “to hide, conceal; preserve; hide oneself; bury a corpse,” from West Germanic *hudjan (cf. Middle Dutch, Middle Low German huden), from PIE *keudh- (cf. Greek keuthein “to hide, conceal”), from root *(s)keu- “to cover, conceal” (see hide (n.1)). Hide and seek (by 1670s), children’s game, replaced earlier all hid (1580s).
n.

“skin of a large animal,” Old English hyd “hide, skin,” from Proto-Germanic *hudiz (cf. Old Norse huð, Old Frisian hed, Middle Dutch huut, Dutch huid, Old High German hut, German Haut “skin”), related to Old English verb hydan “to hide,” the common notion being of “covering.”

All of this is from PIE root *(s)keu- “to cover, conceal” (cf. Sanskrit kostha “enclosing wall,” skunati “covers;” Armenian ciw “roof;” Latin cutis “skin,” scutum “shield,” ob-scurus “dark;” Greek kytos “a hollow, vessel,” keutho “to cover, to hide,” skynia “eyebrows;” Russian kishka “gut,” literally “sheath;” Lithuanian kiautas “husk,” kutis “stall;” Old Norse sky “cloud;” Old English sceo “cloud;” Middle High German hode “scrotum;” Old High German scura, German Scheuer “barn;” Welsh cuddio “to hide”).

The alliterative pairing of hide and hair (often negative, hide nor hair) was in Middle English (early 15c.), but earlier and more common was hide ne hewe, literally “skin and complexion (‘hue’)” (c.1200).

“measure of land” (obsolete), Old English hid “hide of land,” earlier higid, from hiw- “family” (cf. hiwan “household,” hiwo “a husband, master of a household”), from Proto-Germanic *hiwido-, from PIE *keiwo- (cf. Latin civis “citizen”), from root *kei- “to lie; bed, couch; beloved, dear” (see cemetery, and cf. city).

The notion was of “amount of land needed to feed one free family and dependents,” usually 100 or 120 acres, but the amount could be as little as 60, depending on the quality of the land. Often also defined as “as much land as could be tilled by one plow in a year.” Translated in Latin as familia.

noun

horsehide (1940s+ Baseball)

Related Terms

take it out of someone’s hide, tan

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