Hierarchical routing



The complex problem of routing on large networks can be simplified by breaking a network into a hierarchy of smaller networks, where each level is responsible for its own routing. The Internet has, basically, three levels: the backbones, the mid-levels, and the stub networks. The backbones know how to route between the mid-levels, the mid-levels know how to route between the sites, and each site (being an autonomous system) knows how to route internally. See also Exterior Gateway Protocol, Interior Gateway Protocol, transit network.

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  • Hierarchies

    [hahy-uh-rahr-kee, hahy-rahr-] /ˈhaɪ əˌrɑr ki, ˈhaɪ rɑr-/ noun, plural hierarchies. 1. any system of persons or things ranked one above another. 2. government by ecclesiastical rulers. 3. the power or dominion of a hierarch. 4. an organized body of ecclesiastical officials in successive ranks or orders: the Roman Catholic hierarchy. 5. one of the three […]

  • Hierarchise

    [hahy-uh-rahr-kahyz, hahy-rahr-] /ˈhaɪ ə rɑrˌkaɪz, ˈhaɪ rɑr-/ verb (used with object), hierarchized, hierarchizing. 1. to arrange in a .



  • Hierarchist

    [hahy-uh-rahr-kiz-uh m, hahy-rahr-kiz-] /ˈhaɪ əˌrɑr kɪz əm, ˈhaɪ rɑrˌkɪz-/ noun 1. hierarchical principles, rule, or influence.

  • Hierarchists

    [hahy-uh-rahr-kiz-uh m, hahy-rahr-kiz-] /ˈhaɪ əˌrɑr kɪz əm, ˈhaɪ rɑrˌkɪz-/ noun 1. hierarchical principles, rule, or influence.



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