Honoured



[on-er] /ˈɒn ər/

noun, verb (used with object), adjective, Chiefly British.
1.
.
[on-er] /ˈɒn ər/
noun
1.
honesty, fairness, or integrity in one’s beliefs and actions:
a man of honor.
2.
a source of credit or distinction:
to be an honor to one’s family.
3.
high respect, as for worth, merit, or rank:
to be held in honor.
4.
such respect manifested:
a memorial in honor of the dead.
5.
high public esteem; fame; glory:
He has earned his position of honor.
6.
the privilege of being associated with or receiving a favor from a respected person, group, organization, etc.:
to have the honor of serving on a prize jury; I have the honor of introducing this evening’s speaker.
7.
Usually, honors. evidence, as a special ceremony, decoration, scroll, or title, of high rank, dignity, or distinction:
political honors; military honors.
8.
(initial capital letter) a deferential title of respect, especially for judges and mayors (preceded by His, Her, Your, etc.).
9.
honors.

10.
chastity or purity in a woman.
11.
Also called honor card. Cards.

12.
Golf. the privilege of teeing off before the other player or side, given after the first hole to the player or side that won the previous hole.
verb (used with object)
13.
to hold in honor or high respect; revere:
to honor one’s parents.
14.
to treat with honor.
15.
to confer honor or distinction upon:
The university honored him with its leadership award.
16.
to worship (the Supreme Being).
17.
to show a courteous regard for:
to honor an invitation.
18.
Commerce. to accept or pay (a draft, check, etc.):
All credit cards are honored here.
19.
to accept as valid and conform to the request or demands of (an official document).
20.
(in square dancing) to meet or salute with a bow.
adjective
21.
of, relating to, or noting honor.
Idioms
22.
be on / upon one’s honor, to accept and acknowledge personal responsibility for one’s actions:
West Point cadets are on their honor not to cheat on an exam.
23.
do honor to,

24.
do the honors, to serve or preside as host, as in introducing people, or carving or serving at table:
Father did the honors at the family Thanksgiving dinner.
/ˈɒnə/
noun, verb
1.
the US spelling of honour
/ˈɒnə/
noun
1.
personal integrity; allegiance to moral principles
2.

3.
(often pl) great respect, regard, esteem, etc, or an outward sign of this
4.
(often pl) high or noble rank
5.
a privilege or pleasure: it is an honour to serve you
6.
a woman’s virtue or chastity
7.

8.
(golf) the right to tee off first
9.
do honour to

10.
do the honours

11.
(Brit, school slang) honour bright, an exclamation pledging honour
12.
in honour bound, under a moral obligation
13.
in honour of, out of respect for
14.
on one’s honour, upon one’s honour, on the pledge of one’s word or good name
verb (transitive)
15.
to hold in respect or esteem
16.
to show courteous behaviour towards
17.
to worship
18.
to confer a distinction upon
19.
to accept and then pay when due (a cheque, draft, etc)
20.
to keep (one’s promise); fulfil (a previous agreement)
21.
to bow or curtsy to (one’s dancing partner)
/ˈɒnə/
noun
1.
preceded by Your, His, or Her

n.

c.1200, “glory, renown, fame earned,” from Anglo-French honour, Old French honor (Modern French honneur), from Latin honorem (nominative honos, later honor) “honor, dignity, office, reputation,” of unknown origin. Till 17c., honour and honor were equally frequent; the former now preferred in England, the latter in U.S. by influence of Noah Webster’s spelling reforms. Meaning “a woman’s chastity” first attested late 14c. Honors “distinction in scholarship” attested by 1782. Honor roll in the scholastic sense attested by 1872. To do the honors (1650s) originally meant the customary civilities and courtesies at a public entertainment, etc.
v.

mid-13c., honuren, “to do honor to,” from Old French honorer, from Latin honorare, from honor (see honor (n.)). In the commercial sense of “accept a bill due, etc.,” it is recorded from 1706. Related: Honored; honoring.

A custom more honoured in the breach than the observance. Whoever will look up the passage (Hamlet I. iv. 16) will see that it means, beyond a doubt, a custom that one deserves more honour for breaking than for keeping: but it is often quoted in the wrong & very different sense of a dead letter or rule more often broken than kept. [Fowler]

chiefly British English spelling of honor; also see -or. Related: Honoured; honouring; honours.
In addition to the idiom beginning with
honor

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