Hull-up



[huhl] /hʌl/

noun
1.
the hollow, lowermost portion of a ship, floating partially submerged and supporting the remainder of the ship.
2.
Aeronautics.

verb (used with object)
3.
to pierce (the hull of a ship), especially below the water line.
verb (used without object)
4.
to drift without power or sails.
Idioms
5.
hull down, (of a ship) sufficiently far away, or below the horizon, that the hull is invisible.
6.
hull up, (of a ship) sufficiently near, or above the horizon, that the hull is visible.
/hʌl/
noun
1.
the main body of a vessel, tank, flying boat, etc
2.
the shell or pod of peas or beans; the outer covering of any fruit or seed; husk
3.
the persistent calyx at the base of a strawberry, raspberry, or similar fruit
4.
the outer casing of a missile, rocket, etc
verb
5.
to remove the hulls from (fruit or seeds)
6.
(transitive) to pierce the hull of (a vessel, tank, etc)
/hʌl/
noun
1.
a city and port in NE England, in Kingston upon Hull unitary authority, East Riding of Yorkshire: fishing, food processing; two universities. Pop: 301 416 (2001). Official name: Kingston upon Hull
2.
a city in SE Canada, in SW Quebec on the River Ottawa: a centre of the timber trade and associated industries. Pop: 66 246 (2001)
/hʌl/
noun
1.
Cordell. 1871–1955, US statesman; secretary of state (1933–44). He helped to found the U.N.: Nobel peace prize 1945
n.

“seed covering,” from Old English hulu “husk, pod,” from Proto-Germanic *hulus “to cover” (cf. Old High German hulla, hulsa; German Hülle, Hülse, Dutch huls). Figurative use by 1831.

“body of a ship,” 1550s, perhaps from hull (n.1) on fancied resemblance of ship keels to open peapods (cf. Latin carina “keel of a ship,” originally “shell of a nut;” Greek phaselus “light passenger ship, yacht,” literally “bean pod;” French coque “hull of a ship; shell of a walnut or egg”). Alternative etymology is from Middle English hoole “ship’s keel” (mid-15c.), from the same source as hold (n.).
v.

“to remove the husk of,” early 15c., from hull (n.1). Related: Hulled, which can mean both “having a particular kind of hull” and “stripped of the hull.”
hull
(hŭl)

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