Hurt



[hurt] /hɜrt/

verb (used with object), hurt, hurting.
1.
to cause bodily injury to; injure:
He was badly hurt in the accident.
2.
to cause bodily pain to or in:
The wound still hurts him.
3.
to damage or decrease the efficiency of (a material object) by striking, rough use, improper care, etc.:
Moths can’t hurt this suit because it’s mothproof. Dirty oil can hurt a car’s engine.
4.
to affect adversely; harm:
to hurt one’s reputation; It wouldn’t hurt the lawn if you watered it more often.
5.
to cause mental pain to; offend or grieve:
She hurt his feelings by not asking him to the party.
verb (used without object), hurt, hurting.
6.
to feel or suffer bodily or mental pain or distress:
My back still hurts.
7.
to cause bodily or mental pain or distress:
The blow to his pride hurt most.
8.
to cause injury, damage, or harm.
9.
to suffer want or need.
noun
10.
a blow that inflicts a wound; bodily injury or the cause of such injury.
11.
injury, damage, or harm.
12.
the cause of mental pain or offense, as an insult.
13.
Heraldry. a rounded azure.
adjective
14.
physically injured:
The hurt child was taken to the hospital.
15.
offended; unfavorably affected:
hurt pride.
16.
suggesting that one has been offended or is suffering in mind:
Take that hurt look off your face!
17.
damaged:
hurt merchandise.
/hɜːt/
verb hurts, hurting, hurt
1.
to cause physical pain to (someone or something)
2.
to cause emotional pain or distress to (someone)
3.
to produce a painful sensation in (someone): the bruise hurts
4.
(intransitive) (informal) to feel pain
noun
5.
physical, moral, or mental pain or suffering
6.
a wound, cut, or sore
7.
damage or injury; harm
adjective
8.
injured or pained physically or emotionally: a hurt knee, a hurt look
/hɜːt/
noun
1.
(Southern English, dialect) another name for whortleberry
v.

c.1200, “to injure, wound” (the body, feelings, reputation, etc.), also “to stumble (into), bump into; charge against, rush, crash into; knock (things) together,” from Old French hurter “to ram, strike, collide,” perhaps from Frankish *hurt “ram” (cf. Middle High German hurten “run at, collide,” Old Norse hrutr “ram”). The English usage is as old as the French, and perhaps there was a native Old English *hyrtan, but it has not been recorded. Meaning “to be a source of pain” (of a body part) is from 1850. To hurt (one’s) feelings attested by 1779. Sense of “knock” died out 17c., but cf. hurtle. Other Germanic languages tend to use their form of English scathe in this sense (cf. Danish skade, Swedish skada, German schaden, Dutch schaden).
n.

c.1200, “a wound, an injury;” also “sorrow, lovesickness,” from hurt (v.).

adjective

Ugly; ill-favored; piss-ugly: I never saw anyone as hurt as her boyfriend (1980s+ Teenagers)
see: not hurt a fly

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  • Hurter

    [hurt] /hɜrt/ verb (used with object), hurt, hurting. 1. to cause bodily injury to; injure: He was badly hurt in the accident. 2. to cause bodily pain to or in: The wound still hurts him. 3. to damage or decrease the efficiency of (a material object) by striking, rough use, improper care, etc.: Moths can’t […]

  • Hurtful

    [hurt-fuh l] /ˈhɜrt fəl/ adjective 1. causing or injury; injurious; harmful. /ˈhɜːtfʊl/ adjective 1. causing distress or injury: to say hurtful things adj. “harmful,” mid-15c., from hurt (n.) + -ful. Related: Hurtfully; hurtfulness.



  • Hurting

    [hurt] /hɜrt/ verb (used with object), hurt, hurting. 1. to cause bodily injury to; injure: He was badly hurt in the accident. 2. to cause bodily pain to or in: The wound still hurts him. 3. to damage or decrease the efficiency of (a material object) by striking, rough use, improper care, etc.: Moths can’t […]

  • Hurtle

    [hur-tl] /ˈhɜr tl/ verb (used without object), hurtled, hurtling. 1. to rush violently; move with great speed: The car hurtled down the highway. 2. to move or go noisily or resoundingly, as with violent or rapid motion: The sound was deafening, as tons of snow hurtled down the mountain. 3. Archaic. to strike together or […]



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