Hype



[hahyp] /haɪp/ Informal.

verb (used with object), hyped, hyping.
1.
to stimulate, excite, or agitate (usually followed by up):
She was hyped up at the thought of owning her own car.
2.
to create interest in by flamboyant or dramatic methods; promote or publicize showily:
a promoter who knows how to hype a prizefight.
3.
to intensify (advertising, promotion, or publicity) by ingenious or questionable claims, methods, etc. (usually followed by up).
4.
to trick; gull.
noun
5.
exaggerated publicity; hoopla.
6.
an ingenious or questionable claim, method, etc., used in advertising, promotion, or publicity to intensify the effect.
7.
a swindle, deception, or trick.
[hahyp] /haɪp/
noun, Slang.
1.
a .
2.
a drug addict, especially one who uses a .
/haɪp/
noun
1.
a hypodermic needle or injection
verb
2.
(intransitive) usually foll by up. to inject oneself with a drug
3.
(transitive) to stimulate artificially or excite
/haɪp/
noun
1.
a deception or racket
2.
intensive or exaggerated publicity or sales promotion: media hype
3.
the person or thing so publicized
verb (transitive)
4.
to market or promote (a product) using exaggerated or intensive publicity
5.
to falsify or rig (something)
6.
(in the pop-music business) to buy (copies of a particular record) in such quantity as to increase its ratings in the charts
n.

“excessive or misleading publicity or advertising,” 1967, American English (the verb is attested from 1937), probably in part a back-formation of hyperbole, but also from underworld slang sense “swindle by overcharging or short-changing” (1926), a back-formation of hyper “short-change con man” (1914), from prefix hyper- meaning “over, to excess.” Also possibly influenced by drug addicts’ slang hype, 1913 shortening of hypodermic needle. Related: Hyped; hyping. In early 18c., hyp “morbid depression of the spirits” was colloquial for hypochondria (usually as the hyp or the hyps).

noun

[fr hypodermic referring to a needle or an injection]

noun

: without any advance PR hype

verb

Related Terms

media hype

[origin unknown; perhaps related to hyper, ”hustle,” of obscure origin, found from the mid-1800s; recent advertising and public relations senses probably influenced by hype1 as suggesting supernormal energy, excitement, etc, and by hyper2 and hyperbole; verb sense 3 supported by a 1914 glossary: ”Hyper, current among money-changers. A flim-flammer”]

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  • Hype cycle

    noun an explanation of the events surrounding the introduction of new technology, including breakthrough or launch, peak of inflated expectations, disillusionment, understanding and enlightenment, productivity plateau. Word Origin created by Gartner Group analyst Jackie Fenn

  • Hyped

    [hahyp] /haɪp/ Informal. verb (used with object), hyped, hyping. 1. to stimulate, excite, or agitate (usually followed by up): She was hyped up at the thought of owning her own car. 2. to create interest in by flamboyant or dramatic methods; promote or publicize showily: a promoter who knows how to hype a prizefight. 3. […]



  • Hyped-up

    [hahypt-uhp] /ˈhaɪptˈʌp/ adjective, Informal. 1. intensively or excessively stimulated or exaggerated: an economy hyped-up by arms spending. adjective

  • Hypegiaphobia

    noun a fear of responsibility; also called hypengyophobia See hypengyophobia Word Origin Greek hypengyos ‘responsible’



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