Imagining



[ih-maj-in] /ɪˈmædʒ ɪn/

verb (used with object), imagined, imagining.
1.
to form a mental of (something not actually present to the senses).
2.
to think, believe, or fancy:
He imagined the house was haunted.
3.
to assume; suppose:
I imagine they’ll be here soon.
4.
to conjecture; guess:
I cannot imagine what you mean.
5.
Archaic. to plan, scheme, or plot.
verb (used without object), imagined, imagining.
6.
to form mental of things not present to the senses; use the .
7.
to suppose; think; conjecture.
/ɪˈmædʒɪn/
verb
1.
(when transitive, may take a clause as object) to form a mental image of
2.
(when transitive, may take a clause as object) to think, believe, or guess
3.
(transitive; takes a clause as object) to suppose; assume: I imagine he’ll come
4.
(transitive; takes a clause as object) to believe or assume without foundation: he imagines he knows the whole story
5.
an archaic word for plot1
sentence substitute
6.
Also imagine that!. an exclamation of surprise
v.

mid-14c., “to form a mental image of,” from Old French imaginer “sculpt, carve, paint; decorate, embellish” (13c.), from Latin imaginari “to form a mental picture to oneself, imagine” (also, in Late Latin imaginare “to form an image of, represent”), from imago (see image). Sense of “suppose” is first recorded late 14c. Related: Imagined; imagining.

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