Imagism



[im-uh-jiz-uh m] /ˈɪm əˌdʒɪz əm/

noun, Literature.
1.
(often initial capital letter) a theory or practice of a group of poets in England and America between 1909 and 1917 who believed that poetry should employ the language of common speech, create new rhythms, have complete freedom in subject matter, and present a clear, concentrated, and precise .
2.
a style of poetry that employs free verse and the patterns and rhythms of common speech.
/ˈɪmɪˌdʒɪzəm/
noun
1.
a poetic movement in England and America between 1912 and 1917, initiated chiefly by Ezra Pound, advocating the use of ordinary speech and the precise presentation of images
n.

name of a movement in poetry that sought clarity of expression through use of precise visual images, “hard light, clear edges,” coined 1912 by Ezra Pound; see image + -ism. Related: Imagist.

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