Imposing



[im-poh-zing] /ɪmˈpoʊ zɪŋ/

adjective
1.
very impressive because of great size, stately appearance, dignity, elegance, etc.:
Notre Dame, Rheims, and other imposing cathedrals of France.
[im-pohz] /ɪmˈpoʊz/
verb (used with object), imposed, imposing.
1.
to lay on or set as something to be borne, endured, obeyed, fulfilled, paid, etc.:
to impose taxes.
2.
to put or set by or as if by authority:
to impose one’s personal preference on others.
3.
to obtrude or thrust (oneself, one’s company, etc.) upon others.
4.
to pass or palm off fraudulently or deceptively:
He imposed his pretentious books on the public.
5.
Printing. to lay (type pages, plates, etc.) in proper order on an or the like and secure in a chase for printing.
6.
to lay on or inflict, as a penalty.
7.
Archaic. to put or place on something, or in a particular place.
8.
Obsolete. to lay on (the hands) ceremonially, as in confirmation or ordination.
verb (used without object), imposed, imposing.
9.
to make an impression on the mind; impose one’s or its authority or influence.
10.
to obtrude oneself or one’s requirements, as upon others:
Are you sure my request doesn’t impose?
11.
to presume, as upon patience or good nature.
Verb phrases
12.
impose on/upon,

/ɪmˈpəʊzɪŋ/
adjective
1.
grand or impressive: an imposing building
/ɪmˈpəʊz/
verb usually foll by on or upon
1.
(transitive) to establish as something to be obeyed or complied with; enforce: to impose a tax on the people
2.
to force (oneself, one’s presence, etc) on another or others; obtrude
3.
(intransitive) to take advantage, as of a person or quality: to impose on someone’s kindness
4.
(transitive) (printing) to arrange pages so that after printing and folding the pages will be in the correct order
5.
(transitive) to pass off deceptively; foist: to impose a hoax on someone
6.
(transitive) (of a bishop or priest) to lay (the hands) on the head of a candidate for certain sacraments
adj.

“that impresses by appearance or manner,” 1786, from present participle of impose (v.). Related: Imposingly.
v.

late 14c., “to lay (a crime, etc.) to the account of,” from Old French imposer “put, place; impute, charge, accuse” (c.1300), from assimilated form of in- “into, in” (see in- (2)) + poser “put, place” (see pose (v.1)). Sense of “to lay on as a burden” first recorded 1580s. Related: Imposed; imposing.

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  • Imposingly

    [im-poh-zing] /ɪmˈpoʊ zɪŋ/ adjective 1. very impressive because of great size, stately appearance, dignity, elegance, etc.: Notre Dame, Rheims, and other imposing cathedrals of France. /ɪmˈpəʊzɪŋ/ adjective 1. grand or impressive: an imposing building adj. “that impresses by appearance or manner,” 1786, from present participle of impose (v.). Related: Imposingly.

  • Imposing-stone

    noun, Printing. 1. a slab, formerly of stone but now usually of metal, on which pages of type or plates are imposed and on which type correcting in the page is done. noun 1. (printing) a flat hard surface upon which pages printed from hot metal are imposed



  • Imposition

    [im-puh-zish-uh n] /ˌɪm pəˈzɪʃ ən/ noun 1. the laying on of something as a burden or obligation. 2. something , as a burden or duty; an unusual or extraordinarily burdensome requirement or task. 3. the act of by or as if by authority. 4. an instance of upon a person: He did the favor but […]

  • Impossibility

    [im-pos-uh-bil-i-tee, im-pos-] /ɪmˌpɒs əˈbɪl ɪ ti, ˌɪm pɒs-/ noun, plural impossibilities for 2. 1. condition or quality of being . 2. something . /ɪmˌpɒsəˈbɪlɪtɪ; ˌɪmpɒs-/ noun (pl) -ties 1. the state or quality of being impossible 2. something that is impossible n. late 14c., “quality of being impossible,” from impossible + -ity; perhaps from or […]



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