Inter-company



[kuhm-puh-nee] /ˈkʌm pə ni/

noun, plural companies.
1.
a number of individuals assembled or associated together; group of people.
2.
a guest or guests:
We’re having company for dinner.
3.
an assemblage of persons for social purposes.
4.
companionship; fellowship; association:
I always enjoy her company.
5.
one’s usual companions:
I don’t like the company he keeps.
6.
society collectively.
7.
a number of persons united or incorporated for joint action, especially for business:
a publishing company; a dance company.
8.
(initial capital letter) the members of a firm not specifically named in the firm’s title:
George Higgins and Company.
9.
Military.

10.
a unit of firefighters, including their special apparatus:
a hook-and-ladder company.
11.
Also called ship’s company. a ship’s crew, including the officers.
12.
a medieval trade guild.
13.
the Company, Informal. a nation’s major intelligence-gathering and espionage organization, as the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.
verb (used without object), companied, companying.
14.
Archaic. to associate.
verb (used with object), companied, companying.
15.
Archaic. to accompany.
Idioms
16.
keep company,

17.
part company,

/ˈkʌmpənɪ/
noun (pl) -nies
1.
a number of people gathered together; assembly
2.
the fact of being with someone; companionship: I enjoy her company
3.
a social visitor or visitors; guest or guests
4.
a business enterprise
5.
the members of an enterprise not specifically mentioned in the enterprise’s title Abbreviation Co, co
6.
a group of actors, usually including business and technical personnel
7.
a unit of around 100 troops, usually comprising two or more platoons
8.
the officers and crew of a ship
9.
a unit of Girl Guides
10.
(English history) a medieval guild
11.
keep company, bear company

12.
part company

verb -nies, -nying, -nied
13.
(archaic) to keep company or associate (with someone)
n.

mid-12c., “large group of people,” from Old French compagnie “society, friendship, intimacy; body of soldiers” (12c.), from Late Latin companio (see companion). Meaning “companionship” is from late 13c. Sense of “business association” first recorded 1550s, having earlier been used in reference to trade guilds (c.1300). Meaning “subdivision of an infantry regiment” is from 1580s. Abbreviation co. dates from 1670s.

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