Inwardness



[in-werd-nis] /ˈɪn wərd nɪs/

noun
1.
the state of being or internal:
the inwardness of the body’s organs.
2.
depth of thought or feeling; concern with one’s own affairs and oneself; introspection.
3.
preoccupation with what concerns human inner nature; spirituality.
4.
the fundamental or intrinsic character of something; essence.
5.
inner meaning or significance.
6.
.
n.

late 14c., from inward + -ness.

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