Jazz-age



noun
1.
the period that in the U.S. extended roughly from the Armistice of 1918 to the stock-market crash of 1929 and was notable for increased prosperity, liberated or hedonistic social behavior, Prohibition and the concomitant rise in production and consumption of bootleg liquor, and the development and dissemination of jazz and ragtime and associated ballroom dances.
noun
1.
(often capitals) the jazz age, (esp in the US) the period between the end of World War I and the beginning of the Depression during which jazz became popular
noun

the 1920s and thereabouts, characterized by freedom, exuberance, hedonism, etc.

1921; see jazz (n.); popularized 1922 in writings of F. Scott Fitzgerald; usually regarded as the years between the end of World War I (1918) and the Stock Market crash of 1929.

We are living in a jazz age of super-accentuated rhythm in all things; in a rhythm that (to “jazz” a word) is super-normal, a rhythm which is the back-flare from the rhythm of a super war. [“Jacobs’ Band Monthly,” Jan. 1921]

The 1920s in the United States, a decade marked not only by the popularity of jazz, but also by attacks on convention in many areas of American life. (See flappers and Roaring Twenties.)

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