Jim



[jim] /dʒɪm/

noun
1.
a male given name, form of .
[jeem] /dʒim/
noun
1.
the fifth letter of the Arabic alphabet.
[pah-mer or for 6, pahl-] /ˈpɑ mər or for 6, ˈpɑl-/
noun
1.
Alice Elvira, 1855–1902, U.S. educator.
2.
Arnold, born 1929, U.S. golfer.
3.
Daniel David, 1845–1913, Canadian originator of chiropractic medicine.
4.
George Herbert, 1842–1933, U.S. educator, philosopher, and author.
5.
James Alvin (“Jim”) born 1945, U.S. baseball player.
6.
a town in S Massachusetts.
[rahy-uh n] /ˈraɪ ən/
noun
1.
James Ronald (“Jim”) born 1947, U.S. distance runner; congressman 1996–2007.
[thawrp] /θɔrp/
noun
1.
James Francis (“Jim”) 1888–1953, U.S. track-and-field athlete and football and baseball player.
[dahyn] /daɪn/
noun
1.
James (“Jim”) born 1935, U.S. painter.
/daɪn/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to eat dinner
2.
(intransitive; often foll by on, off, or upon) to make one’s meal (of): the guests dined upon roast beef
3.
(transitive) (informal) to entertain to dinner (esp in the phrase wine and dine someone)
/ˈpɑːmə/
noun
1.
(in Medieval Europe) a pilgrim bearing a palm branch as a sign of his visit to the Holy Land
2.
(in Medieval Europe) an itinerant monk
3.
(in Medieval Europe) any pilgrim
4.
any of various artificial angling flies characterized by hackles around the length of the body
/ˈpɑːmə/
noun
1.
Arnold. born 1929, US professional golfer: winner of seven major championships, including four in the US Masters (1958, 1960, 1962, 1964) and two in the British Open (1961,1962)
2.
Samuel. 1805–81, English painter of visionary landscapes, influenced by William Blake
/θɔːp/
noun
1.
Ian. born 1982, Australian swimmer; won three gold medals at the 2000 Olympic Games, six gold medals at the 2002 Commonwealth Games, and two gold medals at the 2004 Olympic Games.
2.
James Francis. 1888–1953, American football player and athlete: Olympic pentathlon and decathlon champion (1912)
3.
Jeremy. born 1929, British politician; leader of the Liberal party (1967–76)
n.

“pilgrim who has returned from the Holy Land,” late 12c. (as a surname), from Anglo-French palmer (Old French palmier), from Medieval Latin palmarius, from Latin palma “palm tree” (see palm (n.2)). So called because they wore palm branches in commemoration of the journey.
v.

late 13c., from Old French disner (Modern French dîner) “to dine, eat, have a meal,” originally “take the first meal of the day,” from stem of Gallo-Romance *desjunare “to break one’s fast,” from Vulgar Latin *disjejunare, from dis- “undo” (see dis-) + Late Latin jejunare “to fast,” from Latin iejunus “fasting, hungry” (see jejune).

verb phrase

To spoil something; damage; bugger: This scale’s all jimmied up (1940s+)

(Gen. 43:16). It was the custom in Egypt to dine at noon. But it is probable that the Egyptians took their principal meal in the evening, as was the general custom in the East (Luke 14:12).

In addition to the idiom beginning with
dine

Tagged:

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