Judgement



[juhj-muh nt] /ˈdʒʌdʒ mənt/

noun
1.
an act or instance of judging.
2.
the ability to judge, make a decision, or form an opinion objectively, authoritatively, and wisely, especially in matters affecting action; good sense; discretion:
a man of sound judgment.
3.
the demonstration or exercise of such ability or capacity:
The major was decorated for the judgment he showed under fire.
4.
the forming of an opinion, estimate, notion, or conclusion, as from circumstances presented to the mind:
Our judgment as to the cause of his failure must rest on the evidence.
5.
the opinion formed:
He regretted his hasty judgment.
6.
Law.

7.
a misfortune regarded as inflicted by divine sentence, as for sin.
8.
(usually initial capital letter). Also called Last Judgment, Final Judgment. the final trial of all people, both the living and dead, at the end of the world.
/ˈdʒʌdʒmənt/
noun
1.
the faculty of being able to make critical distinctions and achieve a balanced viewpoint; discernment
2.

3.
the formal decision of one or more judges at a contest or competition
4.
a particular decision or opinion formed in a case in dispute or doubt
5.
an estimation: a good judgment of distance
6.
criticism or censure
7.
(logic)

8.
against one’s better judgment, contrary to a more appropriate or preferred course of action
9.
sit in judgment

10.
in someone’s judgment, in someone’s opinion
/ˈdʒʌdʒmənt/
noun
1.
the estimate by God of the ultimate worthiness or unworthiness of the individual (the Particular Judgment) or of all mankind (the General Judgment or Last Judgment)
2.
God’s subsequent decision determining the final destinies of all individuals
n.

see judgment. Related: Judgemental.
n.

mid-13c., “action of trying at law, trial,” also “capacity for making decisions,” from Old French jugement “legal judgment; diagnosis; the Last Judgment” (11c.), from jugier (see judge (v.)). From late 13c. as “penalty imposed by a court;” early 14c. as “any authoritative decision, verdict.” From c.1300 in referfence to the Last Judgment. Also from c.1300 as “opinion.” Sense of “discernment” is first recorded 1530s.
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