Junker



[juhng-ker] /ˈdʒʌŋ kər/

noun, Slang.
1.
a car that is old, worn out, or in bad enough repair to be scrapped.
[yoo ng-ker] /ˈyʊŋ kər/
noun
1.
a member of a class of aristocratic landholders, especially in East Prussia, strongly devoted to militarism and authoritarianism, from among whom the German military forces recruited a large number of its officers.
2.
a young German, especially Prussian, nobleman.
3.
a German official or military officer who is narrow-minded, haughty, and overbearing.
[juhngk] /dʒʌŋk/
noun
1.
any old or discarded material, as metal, paper, or rags.
2.
anything that is regarded as worthless, meaningless, or contemptible; trash.
3.
old cable or cordage used when untwisted for making gaskets, swabs, oakum, etc.
4.
Nautical Slang. .
5.
Baseball Slang. relatively slow, unorthodox pitches that are deceptive to the batter in movement or pace, as knuckleballs or forkballs.
verb (used with object)
6.
to cast aside as junk; discard as no longer of use; scrap.
adjective
7.
cheap, worthless, unwanted, or trashy.
/ˈjʊŋkə/
noun
1.
(history) any of the aristocratic landowners of Prussia who were devoted to maintaining their identity and extensive social and political privileges
2.
an arrogant, narrow-minded, and tyrannical German army officer or official
3.
(formerly) a young German nobleman
/dʒʌŋk/
noun
1.
discarded or secondhand objects, etc, collectively
2.
(informal)

3.
(slang) any narcotic drug, esp heroin
verb
4.
(transitive) (informal) to discard as junk; scrap
/dʒʌŋk/
noun
1.
a sailing vessel used in Chinese waters and characterized by a very high poop, flat bottom, and square sails supported by battens
n.

“young German noble,” 1550s, from German Junker, from Old High German juncherro, literally “young lord,” from junc “young” (see young) + herro “lord” (see Herr). Pejorative sense of “reactionary younger member of the Prussian aristocracy” (1865) dates from Bismarck’s domestic policy.
n.

“worthless stuff,” mid-14c., junke “old cable or rope” (nautical), of uncertain origin, perhaps from Old French junc “rush, reed,” also used figuratively as a type of something of little value, from Latin iuncus “rush, reed” (but OED finds “no evidence of connexion”). Nautical use extended to “old refuse from boats and ships” (1842), then to “old or discarded articles of any kind” (1884). Junk food is from 1971; junk art is from 1966; junk mail first attested 1954.

“Chinese sailing ship,” 1610s, from Portuguese junco, from Malay jong “ship, large boat” (13c.), probably from Javanese djong.
v.

1803, “to cut off in lumps,” from junk (n.1). The meaning “to throw away as trash, to scrap” is from 1908. Related: Junked; junking.

New settlers (who should always be here as early in the spring as possible) begin to cut down the wood where they intend to erect their first house. As the trees are cut the branches are to be lopped off, and the trunks cut into lengths of 12 or 14 feet. This operation they call junking them; if they are not junked before fire is applied, they are much worse to junk afterwards. [letter dated Charlotte Town, Nov. 29, 1820, in “A Series of Letters Descriptive of Prince Edward Island,” 1822]

noun

modifier

noun

[fr a British nautical term for old or weak rope or cable, found by 1485]

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