Knocks



[nok] /nɒk/

verb (used without object)
1.
to strike a sounding blow with the fist, knuckles, or anything hard, especially on a door, window, or the like, as in seeking admittance, calling attention, or giving a signal:
to knock on the door before entering.
2.
to strike in collision; bump:
He knocked into a table.
3.
to make a pounding noise:
The engine of our car is knocking badly.
4.
Informal. to engage in trivial or carping criticism; find fault.
5.
Cards. to end a game, as in gin rummy, by laying down a hand in which those cards not included in sets total less than a specific amount.
verb (used with object)
6.
to give a sounding or forcible blow to; hit; strike; beat.
7.
to drive, force, or render by a blow or blows:
to knock a man senseless.
8.
to make by striking a blow or blows:
to knock a hole in the wall.
9.
to strike (a thing) against something else.
10.
Informal. to criticize, especially in a carping manner:
He’s always knocking everything.
11.
British Slang. to astound; impress greatly.
noun
12.
an act or instance of knocking.
13.
the sound of knocking, especially a rap, as at a door.
14.
a blow or thump.
15.
Informal. an adverse criticism.
16.
the noise resulting from faulty combustion or from incorrect functioning of some part of an internal-combustion engine.
17.
Cricket. an innings.
18.
British Slang.

Verb phrases
19.
knock around/about, Informal.

20.
knock back, Slang. to drink (a beverage), especially quickly and heartily:
He knocked back two shots of vodka.
21.
knock down,

22.
knock off,

23.
knock out,

24.
knock over,

25.
knock together, to make or construct in a hurry or with little attention to detail:
He knocked together a couple of tables.
26.
knock up,

Idioms
27.
have it knocked, Slang. to be assured of success:
With a government job, he thought he had it knocked.
28.
knock out of the box, Baseball. to cause a pitcher to be removed from the box because the pitcher has permitted too many hits to be made.
Also, knock out.
29.
knock the / one’s socks off, Informal. to have an overwhelming effect on:
The song knocked the socks off the audience.
/nɒk/
verb
1.
(transitive) to give a blow or push to; strike
2.
(intransitive) to rap sharply with the knuckles, a hard object, etc, esp to capture attention: to knock at the door
3.
(transitive) to make or force by striking: to knock a hole in the wall
4.
(intransitive) usually foll by against. to collide (with)
5.
(transitive) to bring into a certain condition by hitting or pushing: to knock someone unconscious
6.
(transitive) (informal) to criticize adversely; belittle: to knock someone’s work
7.
(intransitive) Also pink. (of an internal-combustion engine) to emit a characteristic metallic noise as a result of faulty combustion
8.
(intransitive) (of a bearing, esp one in an engine) to emit a regular characteristic sound as a result of wear
9.
(Brit, slang) to have sexual intercourse with (a person)
10.
(informal) knock a person into the middle of next week, to hit a person with a very heavy blow
11.
knock one’s head against, to have a violent or unpleasant encounter with (adverse facts or circumstances)
12.
knock on the head

noun
13.

14.
the sound of knocking in an engine or bearing
15.
(informal) a misfortune, rebuff, or setback
16.
(informal) unfavourable criticism
17.
(informal) (in cricket) an innings or a spell of batting
v.

Old English cnocian (West Saxon cnucian), “to pound, beat; knock (on a door),” likely of imitative origin. Meaning “deprecate, put down” is from 1892. Related: Knocked; knocking. Knock-kneed first attested 1774. Knock-down, drag-out is from 1827. Command knock it off “stop it” is first recorded 1880, perhaps from auctioneer’s term for “dispose of quickly:”

At the commencement of the sales, he gave every one that wanted to purchase a paper containing a description of the lands that were to be sold; and, as the sales were cried, he called over the numbers and described the land; and when it got up to one dollar and a quarter an acre, if no body bid, after it was cried two or three times, he would say, knock it off, knock it off. [U.S. Senate record, 1834]

n.

mid-14c., from knock (v.). As an engine noise, from 1899.

noun

Extreme pleasure; gratification; cookies, jollies, kicks: They get their knocks that way

noun

: It wasn’t a disinterested comment—it was a knock/ The knock on Fernandez is he can’t field

verb

Related Terms

don’t knock it, have something cinched

“Though Orientals are very jealous of their privacy, they never knock when about to enter your room, but walk in without warning or ceremony. It is nearly impossible to teach an Arab servant to knock at your door. They give warning at the outer gate either by calling or knocking. To stand and call is a very common and respectful mode. Thus Moses commanded the holder of a pledge to stand without and call to the owner to come forth (Deut. 24:10). This was to avoid the violent intrusion of cruel creditors. Peter stood knocking at the outer door (Acts 12:13, 16), and the three men sent to Joppa by Cornelius made inquiry and ‘stood before the gate’ (10:17, 18). The idea is that the guard over your privacy is to be placed at the entrance.” Knocking is used as a sign of importunity (Matt. 7:7, 8; Luke 13:25), and of the coming of Christ (Luke 12:36; Rev. 3:20).

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Read Also:

  • Knock someone cold

    verb phrase To knock unconscious or semiconscious (1896+)

  • Knock someone dead

    verb phrase To delight or impress someone extremely; kill, KNOCK someone’s SOCKS OFF, wow: I want a fantastic scenery number for my life’s movie. Something that’ll knock ’em dead (1917+)



  • Knock someone out

    verb phrase

  • Knock someone up

    verb phrase



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